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Dell's new Venue 8 Pro 3000 is another affordable Windows tablet

By Michael Rougeau

Dell's new Venue 8 Pro 3000 is another affordable Windows tablet

There always seems to be more room for high-end Windows tablets like the Surface Pro 3, and the same may be true for the other end of the spectrum.

Enter Dell’s new Venue 8 Pro 3000, an affordable Windows 8.1 tablet with zero bells and whistles.

The Dell Venue 8 Pro 3000 starts at $200 (about £125, AU$230), which is more expensive than some of its contemporaries, but it also has slightly better specs.

These include an 8-inch 1280 x 800 display and 32GB of storage.

The high road

Unfortunately the Dell Venue 8 Pro 3000 has little in common with the svelte Dell Venue 8 7000, an Android tablet with an impressive screen and camera.

The rest of the Venue 8 Pro 3000’s specs are exactly what you’d expect: an Intel Atom processor, just 1GB of memory, microSD expansion up to 32GB, Bluetooth, microUSB, and 5- and 1.2-megapixel cameras.

You can certainly do worse at that price, but better is always an option as well when you’re shooting this low.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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HTC's new Rapid Charger cuts certain phones' charging time by 40%

By Michael Rougeau

HTC's new Rapid Charger cuts certain phones' charging time by 40%

Most people are content to simply plug their smartphone into a charger when they go to bed, unhook it in the morning, and maybe give it another boost in the car on the way home.

But charging tech is improving in leaps and bounds lately, and HTC has just upped the ante with its new Rapid Charger 2.0.

The HTC Rapid Charger 2.0 works with any microUSB-charging handset, but certain HTC flagships will benefit from a 40% faster charge, the company says.

These include the HTC One M8, HTC One E8, HTC One Remix, HTC One M8 Harmon Kardon Edition, and HTC Desire Eye.

Charged up

The HTC Rapid Charger 2.0 uses Qualcomm Quick Charge 2.0 tech, which the chip maker unveiled earlier this year.

It follows in the footsteps of Motorola’s Turbo Charger, which can reportedly give phones like the Google Nexus 6 and the Motorola Droid Turbo eight hours of juice after just 15 minutes plugged in.

That’s a lot more than a 40% increase in charging efficiency, so it appears Motorola may have HTC beat in this department.

For a while it seemed like wireless charging was going to be the new hot thing, but if it takes plugging a gadget in to get charging speeds like that then the future may be wired after all.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Google's Copresence might link iOS and Android like never before

By Michael Rougeau

Google's Copresence might link iOS and Android like never before

Devices with different operating systems are traditionally limited in the ways they can interact with one another, but Google may be working to fix that with a feature called “Copresence.”

Google Copresence is a tool that will let iOS and Android devices that are in proximity to one another exchange files, photos, directions, messages, and more, according to Android Police.

The site says that with Copresence, the devices can authenticate with one another using Bluetooth or location information, then transfer data back and forth via Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi direct.

The images above were reportedly unearthed in the latest Google Play Services APK, and they clearly show different types of handsets and tablets – iPhones and iPads and Android devices – interacting with one another.

Dynamite with a laser beam

Developers have reportedly also glimpsed a Copresence API in various documentation, among other clues.

The feature is being compared to Android Beam, a hidden gem for NFC-enabled Android devices, and Google’s Nearby, a feature that was rumored over the summer.

In fact, it seems Copresence may be an evolution of what we were previously hearing about as “Nearby,” or the name of the technology behind the Nearby feature.

Either way, word is we’ll be hearing more straight from Google within “the coming weeks.”

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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More Samsung Ativ S handsets are getting that Windows Phone 8.1 update

By Michael Rougeau

More Samsung Ativ S handsets are getting that Windows Phone 8.1 update

It’s been exactly one week since a select few Samsung Ativ S began receiving their Windows Phone 8.1 updates, and now there’s more good news for Ativ S users this Halloween.

The update was limited at first to Ativ S handsets in Austria, but Windows Central reports that their unlocked UK Ativ S has been upgraded as well.

Users on the site’s forums are saying the same in other regions, so it seems Samsung has begun to push out the WP 8.1 Ativ S update in earnest at last.

Enter Cortana

The over-the-air update bumps the Ativ S up to Windows Phone 8.1, and it also includes the first minor update after that as well.

That bundling may be why it took longer for 8.1 to arrive on Ativ S handsets than it did on Lumia phones, the site speculates.

Windows Phone 8.1 adds speed improvements, bug fixes, new features, and – most importantly – Microsoft’s virtual personal assistant, Cortana.

If you have an Ativ S you may be treated to the update just in time to ask Cortana what kind of candy you should eat this Halloween.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

Why am I getting calendar notifications from a Hotmail account I no longer use?

By Answers I haven’t used my hotmail account in a very long time, having moved over to gmail. However, over the last year I have started to receive calendar notifications to my gmail account. I haven’t turned these on and I haven’t used my hotmail account since 2012. I want to turn them off, but when I […]

Read the full article: Why am I getting calendar notifications from a Hotmail account I no longer use?

…read more

Source:: make use of answers

How can I recover data from an external drive which is not recognised by my computer?

By Answers Hi, my external hard drive suddenly stopped being recognize in my computer. I try to plug it into another computer but it still doesn’t work. I’ve tried to initialise it, but it keep saying “the specified disk is not convertible because the size is less than the minimum size required for GPT disks” and won’t […]

Read the full article: How can I recover data from an external drive which is not recognised by my computer?

…read more

Source:: make use of answers

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The FCC's reported net neutrality proposal will split the internet into two entities

By Juan Martinez

The FCC's reported net neutrality proposal will split the internet into two entities

The US Federal Communications Commission is hoping to strike a balance between the wants and needs of consumers and the desire for internet service providers (ISPs) to charge online companies unfixed rates for faster internet speeds.

The FCC will soon announce a hybrid legal strategy that will give the government agency more control of ISP pricing, according to numerous reports.

The new approach would treat certain aspects of the internet as a public utility, thus giving the government a role in determining how pricing and usage is managed. The proposal would separate internet activity into two entities: wholesale and retail transactions.

Wholesale and retail internet

Wholesale transactions, which The New York Times defines as “the exchange of data from the content provider to the Internet service provider for passage through to the end consumer,” (think Netflix streaming) would be heavily regulated, similar to how telephone service is managed.

What the government is hoping to regulate is the ability for ISPs to cherry-pick how they provide service to digital companies, and namely, how much they charge each service.

Simply put: the government wants ISPs like AT&T to offer content providers like Amazon the same rates it would offer Netflix or Hulu. ISPs want to control pricing without government intervention.

Retail transactions, as drafted in the proposal, are defined as internet service that ISPs send directly to consumers. These transactions would be more loosely regulated by the government.

The legal battle

Although the proposal has yet to be announced, it is expected to be made public some time next month. Unfortunately, we might not get any resolution on the matter for some time – the last two proposals made by the FCC were overturned by federal courts. However, those proposals sought to treat the internet as one ecosystem, rather than as separate wholesale and retail entities.

Either way, look for ISPs to challenge whatever proposal the FCC makes as the battle continues to be waged in Washington.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Blip: Oculus Rift pumpkin is the best pumpkin

By Michael Rougeau

Blip: Oculus Rift pumpkin is the best pumpkin

A lot of people have complained of motion sickness after using an Oculus Rift headset, and although it’s something the company works to improve with every new version, it’s definitely still present.

Just ask this green-gilled jack-o-lantern, posted on Twitter by London’s Blue-Zoo Animation.

The old vomiting pumpkin isn’t the most original idea, but strap a virtual reality headset to it and you’ve got a uniquely 2014 take on a very old custom.

We don’t want to see what would happen if you put it on the Virtuix Omni, too.

More blips

TechRadar’s blips will give you all of the nausea with none of the virtual reality!

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Updated: Best camera 2014: we help you choose the right camera

By Rod Lawton

Updated: Best camera 2014: we help you choose the right camera

Compact cameras vs D-SLRs vs CSCs

Why is choosing a camera so difficult? If you already know what kind of camera you want, of course, you can go straight to our Camera Channel home page for all the latest camera reviews. But for most users it’s not so easy. The range of cameras on sale is massive, stretching from cheap and cheerful compact models competing with your smartphone, right through to professional-spec SLRs that cost as much as a decent used car.

It doesn’t help that makers of low-cost cameras also want to boast about ‘professional’ features, while the makers of more advanced SLR and mirrorless compact system camera want us to know that they’re still easy enough for beginners.

It sounds like every camera is brilliant at everything, which of course it’s not. So here’s our guide to the whole digital camera market, the different camera types available and what to look for, because once you break them down into just three main types, it all starts to get a lot simpler. They are:

  • Compact cameras: perfect for portability and general snapping, but can be more advanced too
  • Digital SLRs: bigger sensors, interchangeable lenses and the pros’ favourite
  • Mirrorless compact system cameras: SLR-sized sensors and interchangeable lenses, but in a smaller, lighter and more novice friendly design

We’ll look at the pros and cons of each type so that you’ve got a better idea which one would suit you best, and we’ll explain some of the jargon and key technologies along the way.

Compact cameras

This is the biggest group and the one with the widest variety of cameras. Traditionally, these are called ‘compact’ because they are smaller than the digital SLRs the pros use and mostly you can slide them into a coat or trouser pocket. The sensors are much smaller, though, so while the quality is fine for point-and-shoot snapshots it falls some way short of the quality you get with more advanced cameras.

Nikon CoolPix L29

At the same time, there’s been a big growth in ‘bridge’ cameras with SLR styling and very long zoom ranges. They are indeed a kind of ‘bridge’ between pocket-sized compacts and powerful SLRs. You can shoot a much wider range of subjects and with more photographic controls.

These bridge cameras won’t fit in your pocket, though, and they mostly use sensors the same size as those in regular compact cameras (though there are exceptions). This means you do get more scope and options, but not necessarily more picture quality.

Canon SX60 HS

There’s also been an increase in the number of high-end compact cameras, sometimes with large sensors or fixed focal length lenses. Designed for experts, these can get close to the quality and control you get from an SLR.

Sony RX1R

So-called ‘compact’ cameras aren’t always compact and don’t always have small sensors, then! But they do have one thing in common – the lens is permanently attached to the camera. When you choose a compact camera you need to pay extra attention to the lens to make sure it covers the zoom range you need.

There’s more about this in our Best compact camera guide. And because compact cameras now come in so many shapes and sizes, we split them up into broad groups to make them easier to categorise.

  • Regular compacts: pocketable snapshot cameras
  • High-end/advanced compact cameras: SLR features and/or quality in a pocket-sized body
  • Bridge cameras: huge zoom ranges, SLR styling – ‘do-it-all’ cameras
  • Travel/superzoom cameras: the size of a compact but the zoom range (almost) of a bridge camera
  • Waterproof/adventure cameras: compact and waterproof, shockproof, even freeze-proof!

Basic compact cameras are perfect for beginners, and there are more advanced models with bigger sensors aimed at enthusiasts and experts too.

If you are a keen photographer, though, a compact camera will only take you so far, however advanced it is. It might be worth considering as a ‘second’ camera to carry around, but it probably won’t be enough as a main camera. This is where you need to start looking at interchangeable lens cameras, or ‘ILC’s. Until recently, these came in just one type – the SLR.

Digital SLRs

Single lens reflex cameras have been around for decades and have long been the top choice for professionals and enthusiast photographers.

Digital SLRs use the same tried and tested design as SLR film cameras. You compose your photos using an optical viewfinder on the top of the camera, and the big innovation when SLRs were first invented was that you were looking at the scene through the camera’s own lens, not a separate, external viewfinder.

This is still how the SLR design works. A mirror inside the body reflects the image up into the viewfinder, right up until the moment you press the shutter button. At that point, the mirror flips up out of the way and the image passes straight through to the back of the camera, where the shutter opens to expose the sensor.

Nikon D810

It sounds complicated, but camera makers have had decades to perfect this design, and SLRs are fast, responsive and durable, and give you an excellent view of the scene you’re photographing.

Digital SLRs use two sensor sizes. Cheaper models use APS-C sensors, which are about half the size of the full-frame (35mm negative size) sensors in professional models.

There are just three SLR makers still active in the camera market. The big names are Canon and Nikon, but there’s another brand in the mix too – Pentax is often overlooked as an SLR maker, but produces some great cameras.

Canon and Nikon produce cameras to suit all budgets and levels of expertise, from low-cost entry-level cameras for novices and students, …read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Google Play video channel is now available on some Roku devices

By Michael Rougeau

Google Play video channel is now available on some Roku devices

The content available on Roku devices continues to expand, today with a new Google Play TV & Movies channel app.

Unfortunately the Google Play channel is available only on the current generation of Roku players, the Roku 3.

It’s also available only in the US, UK, Ireland, and Canada, further limiting the availability of Google Play video content on Roku boxes.

Halloween treat

Roku 3 users who don’t already have a Google Play account will get a free digital copy of X-Men when they sign up for one on their set-top boxes.

And a Roku blog post hints that more titles will be released for free down the line in the channel’s “Gifts from Google” section.

But given that today is Halloween, a lot of Roku 3 owners will probably be checking out Google Play’s horror movie selection.

There are some true classics on there, from Stephen King’s It to Killer Mermaid. Yeah, this was a smart day to launch the new channel.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

How do I get rid of the AVG popup window on my PC?

By Answers Regarding my AVG homepage: recently, I saw a small 3×5 inch form (on my screen) asking if I want to continue using AVG as my home page. I checked “yes I do want the AVG homepage and settings”. The second choice I left alone (there were two choices to consider). Since that time (at least a month or […]

Read the full article: How do I get rid of the AVG popup window on my PC?

…read more

Source:: make use of answers

How do I configure multiboot for the Windows 10 Technical Preview?

By Answers I downloaded and installed the Windows 10 Technical Preview. Since then, when I hit restart it doesn’t go to the multi-boot so I can choose the next bootable operating system. Instead of booting Windows 10TP, my computer just restarts back into the original OS. What can I do to boot into Windows 10?

Read the full article: How do I configure multiboot for the Windows 10 Technical Preview?

…read more

Source:: make use of answers

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OFFER: Bag yourself a deal this Christmas with these great magazine offers

By TechRadar

OFFER: Bag yourself a deal this Christmas with these great magazine offers

Everyone likes a deal and TechRadar is no different. In fact, we like deals so much we’re bringing you five of them in one go.

Our sister magazines are serving up some wallet-pleasing Christmas discounts and we feel duty bound to pass them on to fellow Tech lovers. Whether you’re treating yourself or looking for an unsubtle hint to drop to a loved one, there are impressive savings to be had on some top titles.

And don’t worry if the prospect of subscribing to a print magazine feels as anachronistic to you as making notes on a Palm Pilot because digital subscriptions are also available with some equally hefty discounts. Here’s what’s on offer…

T3

Gadget nuts need look no further than T3. For just £19.49 for a year you can enjoy both the print and interactive digital edition of the mag for six months – the saving of 62% surprised even some of our grizzled industry veterans:

Click here

MacFormat

If your tech world is dominated by a love of all things originating from Cupertino then MacFormat is your perfect match. Promising to satisfy all your Apple needs, it’s packed with advice for all things Mac, iPhone and iPad, and available from just £10.99 for a year if you opt for the fully interactive digital edition:

Click here

Linux Format

And for anyone whose Christmas Day typically involves rushing through the cracker-pulling festivities in order to spend more time tinkering with a Raspberry Pi then a Linux Format subscription is a must, with prices starting at just £25.49 for the digital edition.

Click here

Windows Help and Advice

With the launch of Windows 10 likely to be a defining Microsoft moment in 2015, what better time could there be to stock up on Windows-focused information? Save 50% on a subscription to Windows Help and Advice right here

Click here

PC Format

Last but not least, if performance computing is your particular poison then PC Format possesses all the rig-building, overclocking and GPU optimising advice you could ever want. Prices start at £30.99 for a year for the print and digital edition bundle:

Click here

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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New Nintendo 3DS won't launch in US and UK until 2015, here's why

By Andrew Williams

New Nintendo 3DS won't launch in US and UK until 2015, here's why

Nintendo has explained why the New Nintendo 3DS has launched in Japan, but won’t come to the UK, US and Europe until 2015.

The New Nintendo 3DS could be an obvious Christmas smash hit in the US and Europe, but Nintendo has decided to ditch that potential in favour of a later launch for the new handheld.

During a recent financial briefing, Nintendo President Satoru Iwata explained that in Japan, where the New 3DS has recently launched, 3DS sales slowed significantly while the US and Europe don’t yet need the new model.

“The overseas markets are different from the Japanese market in both their stages of popularisation of Nintendo 3DS and their market characteristics,” Iwata explained.

“Neither of the cumulative sales figures of Nintendo 3DS in the U.S. nor Europe is more than that in Japan despite, based on the historical performance, bigger sales potential. In short, Nintendo 3DS is still at an earlier stage of popularisation in these two markets.”

So either we in the West haven’t bought enough 3DS handhelds to date, or are still buying too many, depending on which way you approach it.

Turning Japanese

By comparison, Iwata makes it sound like the original 3DS is on its last legs in Japan.

“In Japan, the total number of sales of Nintendo 3DS has reached nearly 17 million in the three and a half years since its launch. It is almost the same as the lifetime sales of GameBoy Advance released in 2001, which implies that it is reasonable that the sales of Nintendo 3DS have been temporarily slow moving in the Japanese market. This is one of the reasons we needed to bring New Nintendo 3DS/3DS XL to the market this year.”

Australia is to get the new handheld this year too, but the rest of us still have a while to wait.

3DS vs New 3DS

The main differences between the current 3DS and the New 3DS include much better battery life, interchangeable front plates and a second analogue stick.

3D performance has also been improved, letting you see the effect from a wider angle, and the New 3DS has a faster processor than the original.

As part of the financial call where we learnt about the New 3DS disappointment, Nintendo also announced the 3DS series has sold 45.4 million units to date.

via TechnoBuffalo

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Microsoft Outlook for Mac to look more like Outlook on PC

By Juan Martinez

Microsoft Outlook for Mac to look more like Outlook on PC

If you aren’t a fan of Microsoft applications on Apple devices, Microsoft has an announcement with you in mind. The company has updated its Outlook email client for Mac users and it will introduce a new version of Office for Mac by the end of 2015.

The updated Outlook tool features improved threading, a new interface and online archiving that will help you find old emails on the Outlook web platform. The goal of the launch is to provide a more consistent experience across PC and Mac devices, according to Microsoft. The new Mac interface will look and feel similar to Outlook on PC.

The new interface will include improved scrolling and agility when switching between Ribbon tabs, Microsoft said. It will also feature Master Category List enhancements that will enable users to name and color lists that sync between all Outlook clients.

The update is readily available at no additional cost for Office 365 commercial customers and Office 365 Home, Office 365 Personal and Office 365 University subscribers.

Office for Mac

In the first half of 2015 Microsoft says it will release a public beta for the next version of Office for Mac.

The final release will be available during the second half of the year, the company says. Office 365 commercial and consumer subscribers will get the next version at no additional cost.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Review: mini review: Bose QuietComfort 25

By Cameron Faulkner

Review: mini review: Bose QuietComfort 25

The Bose QuietComfort 25 are the best headphones I’ve ever used. I say that as someone who strives for maximum performance per dollar when purchasing headphones. I say that as someone who believes that, in most circumstances, you can find a cheaper product that performs as well, if not better, than a more expensive option if you do some research.

As someone who has never spent more than $40 on headphones, I’m up to the task of telling you why, starting at $300, the Bose QuietComfort 25 headphones are worth your money.

Design

The arrival of the QuietComfort 25 headphones coincides with Bose’s 50th birthday and with that, a look in the mirror revealed that their line of products needed to be spruced up, made more accessible and stylish for a new generation. Packed into a leather zip-up carrying case, the headphones lay in a sporty pose, already riffing off of this new injection of style. Similar in overall looks to the QC15 headphones from years ago, the design of the QC25 offers many subtle improvements upon its predecessor.

Moving away from the leathery, executive-style of the QC15, Bose has refreshed the headband materials with a cotton and felt combo that’s less prone to becoming warm and dampened from continuous use. The new materials look cool, but do nothing to reduce the “headphone hair” you’ll inevitably get if you use these for more than a half hour.

Bose QuietComfort 25 review

The headphone cups have received an overhaul. Sealed with automotive-grade paint, the signature ovular over-the-ear cups have done away with the roundness found on the QC15 and incorporated some sharp looks in place. On my review unit, accents of black, charcoal and blue create a nice palette of plastics.

A nice design touch fixed what I hate about most headphones, that I commonly find it to be too hard to tell which ear goes where. With the QC25, a big “L” and “R” are etched into the sporty speaker mesh’s design.

Each headphone houses unique features, making it easy to distinguish which ear it should be on after some practice. The left cup has an auxiliary port, the point of contact for the included three-foot 3.5mm cable with inline controls. When you want to pause a song, adjust volume or ask Siri a question, it’s on your left. The right cup houses the noise-cancellation switch, so if you’re annoyed by the outside world, your controls are on the right.

Bose QuietComfort 25 review

For an extra $100, a fourth of the unit’s total price, you can customize the color appearance of the QC25 headphones. I found the stock options to be appealing enough for my taste, and there’s no denying how cool you can make the custom headphones look, but that price seems like a spanking.

Performance

In the past, using the Bose QuietComfort 15 meant that noise-cancellation was required to be powered on or else you wouldn’t hear anything. It was a bummer shelling out the cash and being stuck with this “all-or-nothing” conundrum. Thankfully, Bose has addressed this flaw by allowing the QC25’s to be used without noise-cancellation, battery-free.

With a AAA battery in, I found the noise-cancellation to be extremely effective at zapping out ambient noises and it kept me distraction-free for longer than I knew was possible. It’s possible to use the noise-cancellation feature for up to 35 hours per battery, but I was able to squeeze more time out of mine.

Bose QuietComfort 25 review

The sound engineered in the Bose QuietComfort 25 is exemplary. The lows, mids and highs come through clear as day, never stepping over each other. Music of all sorts sounds predictably incredible. With the noise-cancellation, I’d liken it virtual reality for you ears. I’ve never felt further immersed and concentrated than when I let the QC25 engulf my ears. I played some games on my PC and the results were fabulous and memorable. Near the tail-end of Batman: Arkham City, the QC25 drew me further into a particularly trippy sequence.

With noise-cancellation off, these headphones still pump out a totally respectable sound with all of the highlights I mentioned earlier. There are times when noise-cancellation makes me a little too focused and once I switch it off, I feel like I stepped out of cryo-sleep, so it’s great to have the option to listen to music with noise-cancellation switched off.

We liked

The Bose QuietComfort 25 is a cohesive unit that balances design, features and sound profile delicately, and excels at it all.

While $300 is certainly a chunk of change, the QC25 represents a good value based on its stunning build quality, feature set and vibrant sound. You’re getting a finely-tuned set of headphones that provide over 35 hours of very good noise-cancelling performance with one AAA battery.

We disliked

The ability to customize the QC25, while awesome, costs a fourth of the total price.

Final verdict

The Bose QuietComfort 25 bring out nothing but the best in my media. They are a unique piece of technology in that they not only deliver a mind-blowing first impression, but offer it during each and every use, again and again. If you’re serious about sound and want to hear your favorite movies, music and games in a new immersive way, or if you just want the best set of noise-cancelling headphones you can get for $300, the QC25 is for you.

…read more

Source:: android

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Review: mini review: Bose QuietComfort 25

By Cameron Faulkner

Review: mini review: Bose QuietComfort 25

The Bose QuietComfort 25 are the best headphones I’ve ever used. I say that as someone who strives for maximum performance per dollar when purchasing headphones. I say that as someone who believes that, in most circumstances, you can find a cheaper product that performs as well, if not better, than a more expensive option if you do some research.

As someone who has never spent more than $40 on headphones, I’m up to the task of telling you why, starting at $300, the Bose QuietComfort 25 headphones are worth your money.

Design

The arrival of the QuietComfort 25 headphones coincides with Bose’s 50th birthday and with that, a look in the mirror revealed that their line of products needed to be spruced up, made more accessible and stylish for a new generation. Packed into a leather zip-up carrying case, the headphones lay in a sporty pose, already riffing off of this new injection of style. Similar in overall looks to the QC15 headphones from years ago, the design of the QC25 offers many subtle improvements upon its predecessor.

Moving away from the leathery, executive-style of the QC15, Bose has refreshed the headband materials with a cotton and felt combo that’s less prone to becoming warm and dampened from continuous use. The new materials look cool, but do nothing to reduce the “headphone hair” you’ll inevitably get if you use these for more than a half hour.

Bose QuietComfort 25 review

The headphone cups have received an overhaul. Sealed with automotive-grade paint, the signature ovular over-the-ear cups have done away with the roundness found on the QC15 and incorporated some sharp looks in place. On my review unit, accents of black, charcoal and blue create a nice palette of plastics.

A nice design touch fixed what I hate about most headphones, that I commonly find it to be too hard to tell which ear goes where. With the QC25, a big “L” and “R” are etched into the sporty speaker mesh’s design.

Each headphone houses unique features, making it easy to distinguish which ear it should be on after some practice. The left cup has an auxiliary port, the point of contact for the included three-foot 3.5mm cable with inline controls. When you want to pause a song, adjust volume or ask Siri a question, it’s on your left. The right cup houses the noise-cancellation switch, so if you’re annoyed by the outside world, your controls are on the right.

Bose QuietComfort 25 review

For an extra $100, a fourth of the unit’s total price, you can customize the color appearance of the QC25 headphones. I found the stock options to be appealing enough for my taste, and there’s no denying how cool you can make the custom headphones look, but that price seems like a spanking.

Performance

In the past, using the Bose QuietComfort 15 meant that noise-cancellation was required to be powered on or else you wouldn’t hear anything. It was a bummer shelling out the cash and being stuck with this “all-or-nothing” conundrum. Thankfully, Bose has addressed this flaw by allowing the QC25’s to be used without noise-cancellation, battery-free.

With a AAA battery in, I found the noise-cancellation to be extremely effective at zapping out ambient noises and it kept me distraction-free for longer than I knew was possible. It’s possible to use the noise-cancellation feature for up to 35 hours per battery, but I was able to squeeze more time out of mine.

Bose QuietComfort 25 review

The sound engineered in the Bose QuietComfort 25 is exemplary. The lows, mids and highs come through clear as day, never stepping over each other. Music of all sorts sounds predictably incredible. With the noise-cancellation, I’d liken it virtual reality for you ears. I’ve never felt further immersed and concentrated than when I let the QC25 engulf my ears. I played some games on my PC and the results were fabulous and memorable. Near the tail-end of Batman: Arkham City, the QC25 drew me further into a particularly trippy sequence.

With noise-cancellation off, these headphones still pump out a totally respectable sound with all of the highlights I mentioned earlier. There are times when noise-cancellation makes me a little too focused and once I switch it off, I feel like I stepped out of cryo-sleep, so it’s great to have the option to listen to music with noise-cancellation switched off.

We liked

The Bose QuietComfort 25 is a cohesive unit that balances design, features and sound profile delicately, and excels at it all.

While $300 is certainly a chunk of change, the QC25 represents a good value based on its stunning build quality, feature set and vibrant sound. You’re getting a finely-tuned set of headphones that provide over 35 hours of very good noise-cancelling performance with one AAA battery.

We disliked

The ability to customize the QC25, while awesome, costs a fourth of the total price.

Final verdict

The Bose QuietComfort 25 bring out nothing but the best in my media. They are a unique piece of technology in that they not only deliver a mind-blowing first impression, but offer it during each and every use, again and again. If you’re serious about sound and want to hear your favorite movies, music and games in a new immersive way, or if you just want the best set of noise-cancelling headphones you can get for $300, the QC25 is for you.

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Source:: Tech Radar

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Review: mini review: Bose QuietComfort 25

By Cameron Faulkner

Review: mini review: Bose QuietComfort 25

The Bose QuietComfort 25 are the best headphones I’ve ever used. I say that as someone who strives for maximum performance per dollar when purchasing headphones. I say that as someone who believes that, in most circumstances, you can find a cheaper product that performs as well, if not better, than a more expensive option if you do some research.

As someone who has never spent more than $40 on headphones, I’m up to the task of telling you why, starting at $300, the Bose QuietComfort 25 headphones are worth your money.

Design

The arrival of the QuietComfort 25 headphones coincides with Bose’s 50th birthday and with that, a look in the mirror revealed that their line of products needed to be spruced up, made more accessible and stylish for a new generation. Packed into a leather zip-up carrying case, the headphones lay in a sporty pose, already riffing off of this new injection of style. Similar in overall looks to the QC15 headphones from years ago, the design of the QC25 offers many subtle improvements upon its predecessor.

Moving away from the leathery, executive-style of the QC15, Bose has refreshed the headband materials with a cotton and felt combo that’s less prone to becoming warm and dampened from continuous use. The new materials look cool, but do nothing to reduce the “headphone hair” you’ll inevitably get if you use these for more than a half hour.

Bose QuietComfort 25 review

The headphone cups have received an overhaul. Sealed with automotive-grade paint, the signature ovular over-the-ear cups have done away with the roundness found on the QC15 and incorporated some sharp looks in place. On my review unit, accents of black, charcoal and blue create a nice palette of plastics.

A nice design touch fixed what I hate about most headphones, that I commonly find it to be too hard to tell which ear goes where. With the QC25, a big “L” and “R” are etched into the sporty speaker mesh’s design.

Each headphone houses unique features, making it easy to distinguish which ear it should be on after some practice. The left cup has an auxiliary port, the point of contact for the included three-foot 3.5mm cable with inline controls. When you want to pause a song, adjust volume or ask Siri a question, it’s on your left. The right cup houses the noise-cancellation switch, so if you’re annoyed by the outside world, your controls are on the right.

Bose QuietComfort 25 review

For an extra $100, a fourth of the unit’s total price, you can customize the color appearance of the QC25 headphones. I found the stock options to be appealing enough for my taste, and there’s no denying how cool you can make the custom headphones look, but that price seems like a spanking.

Performance

In the past, using the Bose QuietComfort 15 meant that noise-cancellation was required to be powered on or else you wouldn’t hear anything. It was a bummer shelling out the cash and being stuck with this “all-or-nothing” conundrum. Thankfully, Bose has addressed this flaw by allowing the QC25’s to be used without noise-cancellation, battery-free.

With a AAA battery in, I found the noise-cancellation to be extremely effective at zapping out ambient noises and it kept me distraction-free for longer than I knew was possible. It’s possible to use the noise-cancellation feature for up to 35 hours per battery, but I was able to squeeze more time out of mine.

Bose QuietComfort 25 review

The sound engineered in the Bose QuietComfort 25 is exemplary. The lows, mids and highs come through clear as day, never stepping over each other. Music of all sorts sounds predictably incredible. With the noise-cancellation, I’d liken it virtual reality for you ears. I’ve never felt further immersed and concentrated than when I let the QC25 engulf my ears. I played some games on my PC and the results were fabulous and memorable. Near the tail-end of Batman: Arkham City, the QC25 drew me further into a particularly trippy sequence.

With noise-cancellation off, these headphones still pump out a totally respectable sound with all of the highlights I mentioned earlier. There are times when noise-cancellation makes me a little too focused and once I switch it off, I feel like I stepped out of cryo-sleep, so it’s great to have the option to listen to music with noise-cancellation switched off.

We liked

The Bose QuietComfort 25 is a cohesive unit that balances design, features and sound profile delicately, and excels at it all.

While $300 is certainly a chunk of change, the QC25 represents a good value based on its stunning build quality, feature set and vibrant sound. You’re getting a finely-tuned set of headphones that provide over 35 hours of very good noise-cancelling performance with one AAA battery.

We disliked

The ability to customize the QC25, while awesome, costs a fourth of the total price.

Final verdict

The Bose QuietComfort 25 bring out nothing but the best in my media. They are a unique piece of technology in that they not only deliver a mind-blowing first impression, but offer it during each and every use, again and again. If you’re serious about sound and want to hear your favorite movies, music and games in a new immersive way, or if you just want the best set of noise-cancelling headphones you can get for $300, the QC25 is for you.

…read more

Source:: android

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ASUS and Acer First OEMs to Launch Chrome Devices in Taiwan

By Joey-Elijah Sneddon

acer chromebook 13 tega

Acer and ASUS have become the first OEMs to begin selling Chromebooks and Chromeboxes in Taiwan. Announcing its intentions in a press event on Friday, October 31, Taiwanese computer maker Acer said its Chrome OS devices will launch in the first week of November. While primarily targeting the education and business sectors — the driving force of Chrome device growth […]

The article ASUS and Acer First OEMs to Launch Chrome Devices in Taiwan was first published on OMG! Chrome!

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Source:: omgchrome