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Industry voice: The dangers of mobility: how to provide a secure platform for work collaboration

By Anders Lofgren

Industry voice: The dangers of mobility: how to provide a secure platform for work collaboration

The advent of mobility is radically affecting the way organisations conduct business. Financial services, healthcare organisations, pharmaceutical companies, education institutions, publishing houses, government agencies and others, are all embracing enterprise mobility.

But while mobility can bring tremendous benefits, it also presents significant challenges for the IT department. To name a few:

1. How can enterprise IT provide a secure method to enable anytime, anywhere access to content on the organisation’s servers, NAS or SharePoint and the individual’s desktop laptop content across all their devices (laptop, desktop, smartphone, and tablet)?

2. How do organisations deliver a secure solution that allows users to share content with internal and external constituents across their desktop, laptop, tablet or smartphone?

3. Can the IT department offer a viable alternative to users to access, sync and share their corporate content over insecure and unauthorised cloud services such as Dropbox?

4. How do organisations ensure IT has visibility into access, sync and share activities for auditing purposes?

5. Is IT deploying a Mobile Device Management (MDM) solution that meets the secure content access needs of enterprises?

Giving employees what they want

Enterprise IT has to maintain control over security and compliance but it also has to serve employees seeking to access, sync and share corporate content across any and all of their devices. They want:

To securely access, edit and create content – residing on file servers, NAS or SharePoint, on their mobile devices.

Anytime, anywhere access to their individual content regardless of the device – phone, tablet, desktop/laptop, whichever they choose to use.

To share business content securely with colleagues, customers, partners and other external constituents.

How IT departments should respond

To manage this new environment and maintain control, security and visibility, the IT department needs to set policies, properties, and permissions for individuals, groups and entire organisations. The organisation should also define what resources can be accessed, “who can do what with whom” securely based on their business needs, and ensure it has everything on record for auditing purposes.

To guarantee more effective corporate control, the IT department should look for:

• Integration with Active Directory for seamless authentication, provisioning, user management and resource allocation.

• Enterprise class logging and tracking to give IT the visibility to track all activities, in all details, all the time, what documents are accessed, who are they share with.

• Integration with key Mobile Device Management vendors, such as Absolute, Citrix Worx, Good Technology and MobileIron.

• The ability to securely create and edit Office documents and annotate PDFs within the app itself. Documents should never leave the secure sandbox, eliminating the risk of data leakage.

• Seamless integration with Enterprise level Reverse Proxies, including credential and certificate authentication.

• Maximum data protection and confidentiality via secure end-to-end encryption (over-the-air and on-device).

• The challenges presented by mobility should not be allowed to act as a barrier to the many advantages it delivers. IT can take back control and give employees the access they crave by implementing the appropriate access, sync and share solutions that meet their requirements.

Organisations that square the circle of providing greater flexibility for employees through a mobile strategy that also delivers more effective control, security and compliance will be well positioned to realise significant productivity gains.

  • Anders Lofgren is Acronis‘ Director of Mobility Solutions.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

Fighting Talk: You know what, Apple? I'd rather you spammed me with adverts

By Gary Cutlack

Fighting Talk: You know what, Apple? I'd rather you spammed me with adverts

Tim Cook adopted a defensive stance this week, posting a public letter to Apple fans that set out to underline how honourable and trustworthy his company is.

The core of his argument is that Apple is one of the good guys, because it doesn’t infringe the privacy of its users by selling adverts based upon harvested personal data.

The Apple boss used his bizarre outpouring to stick it to smartphone rival Google, claiming, in terms clearly aimed at puncturing Google’s reliance on the ad-based model, that some companies treat their users as if they’re “the product” rather than a valued customer or a beloved old school friend like Bono.

Sure, Apple’s not quite as aggressive on the adverts as Google can be, but when its phones cost two or three or four or five times as much as the equally capable models of its competitors, there clearly isn’t as much need to pull in pennies per click once the hardware has been sold.

Tim Cook’s happy that his company doesn’t sell personally targeted adverts generating his company $0.03 per 1,000 views, but he’s also perfectly happy to sell a model of the iPhone 6 Plus for £789 (AU$1129, $949). He’s ignoring the pennies and taking care of the pounds, like any good oligarch.

Cash check

A glance at the Apple Store tells us more about why Apple’s not really bothered about the tight margins of the online advertising world.

It doesn’t need to scan emails and serve ads alongside them, because its poor users have to pay a shocking £15 for a replacement should they stupidly lose or break their magical lightning cable.

The hardware produced by Samsung, LG, HTC and the rest of the advert-serving axis of Android can be charged by standard USB lead, as mandated by the European Union. Apple goes it alone, getting around the requirement to use microUSB in Europe by, yes, selling an adaptor.

The standard official 1m lightning to USB cable costs £15 (AU, US$19. That’s a lot. If you have a big bed and a lack of conveniently placed plug sockets and need a longer lead to enable more comfortable in-bed tweeting and charging, a 2m cable costs £25 (AU$, US$29).

Apple is charging its loyal users an extra £10 for one metre of wire. That’s a lot more aggressively capitalistic than serving an advert for weight loss herbs because you emailed a friend saying you had too much pudding last night.

It’s also enabling its peripheral maker friends to cash in, too. Griffin is fortunate enough to have its 3.5mm headphone jack listed on Apple’s official iPhone accessory page, with the jack-to-jack lead listed for £14.95. It’s better than a 99p one from eBay because… it costs more.

It’s gold-plated-hdmi-cables all over again.

Meaningless

Tim’s right, though. Apple devices are nice, well made and enjoyable to use, and quite secure if you’re not a celebrity with the answers to all your past/pet/parent security questions freely available online in a variety of fan Q&A sessions.

But to position the company like it’s some sort of benevolent charity because it doesn’t track or overly advertise to its users is madness.

Apple makes money by selling technology for more than it costs to get some people in China to make, like any good modern capitalist enterprise. Claiming it’s doing good by not selling ads as well is a meaningless boast.

Cook may as well be trying to capitalise on the fact that Apple doesn’t have a track record of presiding over a leaky nuclear reactor. It’s not what it does.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Week in Gaming: Silent Hills, Metal Gear Solid 5 and more: Top moments of the Tokyo Game Show

By Hugh Langley

Week in Gaming: Silent Hills, Metal Gear Solid 5 and more: Top moments of the Tokyo Game Show

Oh, Tokyo Games Show. How have you both impressed and embarrassed us this year? Let me count the ways.

Actually, aside from one major “oh no they didn’t” moment, attendees were treated to a pretty good show this week. Sure, TGS isn’t the massive event it used to be, but with a somewhat disappointing E3 this year Tokyo didn’t exactly have a tough act to follow.

Read on to discover our cherry-picked moments from the past few days.

Yakuza 0

The 80s were great, weren’t they? Were they? I honestly don’t know, I missed out by 26 days. But I’ve always assumed Grand Theft Auto Vice City and Hotline Miami were accurate representations of the decade’s culture, and we’ll leave it at that.

The new trailer for Yakuza is all about the 80s too. You can tell because of the disco dude with the pink jacket and the fact it says 1988. We have no idea what anyone is saying but they sound angry, and we reckon someone probably wants revenge for something.

YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=ka9FuX47_N8

Silent Hills

If, like us, you recently tried the recent PS4 demo PT, Hideo Kojima’s and Guillermo del Toro’s upcoming Silent Hills title, you’ve probably only just stopped having the nightmares.

So the good news is that you can now scare yourself silly once again with a terrifying new trailer for the game, which confirms that del Toro will be much more than just a name in the credits. It’s got his weird brand of creepy written all over it.

Trailer below. Warning: not for the faint of heart

YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=gY91vV0rWr4

Oh, and if you want to know more about del Toro’s role in the game, the following is worth a watch.

YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=zAQlWpcs8nE

Metal Gear Solid 5

But until Silent Hills, Kojima will be preoccupied with Metal Gear Solid 5 – though hopefully for not too much longer. He announced at TGS that Metal Gear Solid 5 will be out in 2015. And to go with it, Hideo treated us to 20 minutes of new gameplay footage.

You’ve had Solid Snake. You’ve had Liquid Snake. Now you’re getting Inflatable Snake.

YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6PiL2BZ4c0

Final Fantasy 15

Square Enix showed off a trailer for Final Fantasy XV at TGS, and it’s really, really pretty. The short clip showcases a bunch of gorgeous vistas and sumptuous environs, but of course it’s the revelation that you’ll be able to drive a car that’s got everyone talking (for some reason).

YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=fnDxg2afpCE

We also learned this week that Square Enix is going to launch a new cloud gaming service in 2015 called Shinra Technologies, which will be lead by former Square Enix president Yoichi Wada.

We hope they’re paying you handsomely for this, Wada. Don’t you remember what happened to the real Shinra?

Bloodborne

We don’t need to say much about this one. It’s Bloodborne. It’s probably going to be spectacular. What else do you need to know?

Here’s the new gameplay trailer from TGS:

YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5o8jwqKsDE

Not enough? Here’s 30 minutes more:

YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvFGQ-tie-o

The Great Ace Attorney

And our final pick of the show is Capcom’s next game in the Ace Attorney series, a TechRadar favourite. Kicking off a brand new story arc, The Great Ace Attorney is set in London in the early 20th century.

It also features Sherlock Holmes, who has a hunch that the woman in the kimono might be Japanese. Slow claps all round.

The game will see Phoenix Wright travel to the UK to study the British legal system. Ha, good luck with that, pal. I did A-Level law and it ain’t no picnic.

YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4JUnUeATrk

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Opinion: Flatpack creativity: can you build a tech cluster from scratch?

By Jay McGregor

Opinion: Flatpack creativity: can you build a tech cluster from scratch?

Introduction

Is the rampant startup culture that’s insidiously burrowing under the skin of UK PLC the saving grace of our future economy? Yes, most economists and politicians will answer emphatically. But is it that cut and dry? Creative hubs in London, Manchester and Cambridge have grown organically and been very successful, organised locally by some enthusiastic people that have benefitted from Goldilocks conditions.

But does that mean that the success of one creative hub can be replicated elsewhere? Can it be artificially recreated and planted in a town that needs a new economic saviour? Or is the rise of the tech hub the result of a combination of factors that ultimately lead to creative success?

A fresh start?

The story of a creative hub always follows the same narrative. Creatives and entrepreneurs settle in a deprived part of a city looking for cheap rents and likeminded people. This creative overspill attracts music, food and entertainment that caters for the new residents. Which in turn attracts others who want to be part of the ‘scene’. When it’s officially known as a scene, you officially have a tech cluster with people starting businesses, just to remain part of the scene.

London, Manchester and Bristol, as well as the tech clusters up and down the country exist because the entrepreneurs in the respective areas wanted to create a business or a community of techies. In every cluster you’ll find at least one person who’s well known for organising meet-ups, hackathons or just being ‘that guy’ who everyone knows and uses as a conduit for networking.

Take Manchester for example – the digital creative sector accounts for around 50,000 jobs and generates around £2bn in economic output every year. It also has the most significant internet exchange outside of London and houses huge data centres. This is all backed up by Manchester Metropolitan University which produces lots of talented digital and media graduates, as well as trade associations like Manchester Digital which promote the cluster. There’s a lot of local support.

But it wasn’t always like this. As digital strategy expert and Manchester’s ‘that guy’, Shaun Fensom, explained to me: “At the start of the digital age Manchester was a depressed rust-belt, failing city.”

“What were the initial conditions that helped it grow such a thriving digital sector? Some of it was doubtless about the universities and the fact that Manchester was the home in the North for media and advertising.

“But digital infrastructure played a vital role. The cluster of digital businesses that grew up around the Telecity hosting space, which later became an internet exchange point, were an important initial condition. This wasn’t about getting access to the internet so much as getting access to the value chain.”

Infrastructure issues

Manchester’s infrastructure provided a huge boost to local businesses and attracted more. A pre-existing gaming industry, which collapsed before the tech cluster fully formed, was reinvigorated with the advent of mobile gaming. This meant that the skills and talent that formed and worked at the many gaming companies were available when tech companies began to show up.

Infrastructure is a necessity, and it’s what largely drove the digital sector in Manchester. However, atmosphere, people and amenities play a big part too, especially for clusters like London’s Silicon Roundabout.

Fensom explained: “There are standard economic regeneration and property issues. But if a location isn’t appealing it won’t work – it needs the right atmosphere and amenities. The clichéd view is that you need great cafés, restaurants and bars, and there’s truth in that. Plus there are straightforward infrastructure issues like housing and transport.”

Can it be replicated?

All of these factors combined meant that Manchester was ripe for hosting a centre of creative tech startups, as with London and other hubs around the country. With help from big business, local councils and entrepreneurs, the hubs formed largely without any top-down management.

The need to replace failing or extinct industries around the UK is apparent, and people are looking to tech for answers. But can the success of the organically grown clusters in other areas be replicated elsewhere with some top-down management, or does it have to happen naturally?

Paul Smith, director of startup accelerator Ignite 100 and ‘that guy’ in the North East, thinks that it has to happen naturally for a tech cluster to truly thrive: “A deprived area would obviously benefit from a tech cluster, but I don’t think it can be built in a vacuum. All successful tech clusters originate in the roots of the local community.

“Maybe there’s a large company to anchor it, but then others seed the community by organising events and develop the first instances of a support network; meet-ups and social events where different people can meet one another and share experiences. Declaring a town or city as a future tech cluster where there’s no naturally occurring activity is a massive challenge, and I can’t recall an example where it’s occurred artificially.”

Argument in favour

Specialising in technology law at DLA Piper, Anthony Day disagrees with Smith and thinks there is an opportunity to replicate successful tech clusters elsewhere: “The key point is that you can artificially create a successful tech cluster if you engineer the situation, as has been the case with the UK Government and Tech City in London. However, to really make a tech hub flourish you need to have access to the finance companies and the bigger corporates that want to play in this space who can help the startups develop and expand, which you are only really going to get in international cities.

“Cambridge tends to get a lot of investment, as you have a lot of great talent coming out of the university and key funders/players see that as a market to invest in. Manchester has also been helped by the BBC move and the regeneration of Media City, Manchester science park, amongst other initiatives.”

Startups in the driving seat

Clearly, it takes a collection of efforts from business, local people and government (who provide the infrastructure) to properly succeed in creating a tech cluster. But, as Fensom concluded, it’s the …read more

Source:: Tech Radar

How can I access my Raspberry Pi from a remote computer over VPN?

By Answers

I have followed the tuturial here on how to setup the Raspberry Pi as a Torrent Box with VPN client to mask my Home IP.

I have a question regarding access to the Pi once it is connected to the VPN. Currently everything is working on my Pi and I can SSH to it and use the Transmission WebUI while I am on my local network of 10.10.1.*

Now the issue I have been struggling to figure out is how to remotely access the Pi properly so I can use the WebUI. I have a Asus RT-AC68U as my main router and have a OpenVPN server running on it. This allows me to VPN into my house and access all my local devices. It is using tun as I need the Android support. The issue with tun is that it assigns a different IP to my clients – 10.8.0.* so when I try to SSH to the Pi or use the WebUI the VPN client on the Pi is redirecting this traffic over the Pi VPN (PIA) and I never get back a response. I switched my Router Server VPN to use TAP and DHCP of my local LAN and the issue was solved as in that configuration my client has a local LAN IP. I imagine I should be able to change the IPtables on the Pi so my 10.8.0.* traffic is not routed over the Pi VPN client but I cannot for the life of me figure it out. If anyone has any suggestions please point me in the right direction I have been reading for hours and hours with no luck.

Post and answer: How can I access my Raspberry Pi from a remote computer over VPN?

…read more

Source:: make use of answers

How do I get a Jelly Bean bootloader on a Samsung GT-19100G Android phone?

By Answers

I wanted to install CyanogenMod on my Samsung GT-19100G, but I was warned that I MUST first upgrade to stock Android 4.x before installing CyanogenMod, or the device won’t boot into the system due to it relying on a newer bootloader.

A 4.1 bootloader is recommended. So how do I get the stock Android 4.X in Ghana.

Post and answer: How do I get a Jelly Bean bootloader on a Samsung GT-19100G Android phone?

…read more

Source:: make use of answers

How do I access the htdocs folder using Chrome in Windows 7?

By Answers

I have been using XAMPP on Windows 7. I’ve copied DVWA (Damn Vulnerable Web Application) to the htdocs folder. When I tried to access it from my browser (Chrome), it shows an “access denied” error. Please help me!

THE ERROR is shown below:

Access forbidden!

You don’t have permission to access the requested object. It is either read-protected or not readable by the server.

If you think this is a server error, please contact the webmaster.

Error 403

localhost
Apache/2.4.7 (Win32) OpenSSL/1.0.1e PHP/5.5.9

Post and answer: How do I access the htdocs folder using Chrome in Windows 7?

…read more

Source:: make use of answers

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Review: mini review: Moga Rebel

By Maxwell Barbanell

Review: mini review: Moga Rebel

Now that iOS 8 is here, there’s a lot to be excited about. Location settings, Airdrop functionality and to top it all off, an iOS-exclusive controller.

The Moga Pro has been out for Android gamers for a little over a year now, but iOS has been without a full-size controller this whole time. The Rebel is about to change that.

It’s a massive step in the right direction after Moga’s first attempt at a MFi controller, the Moga Ace, which TechRadar reviewed earlier this year. It may sound a bit expensive to the casual crowd at a hefty $79 (about £49, AU$88) price point. But if you’re looking to take your on-the-go gaming to the next level, the Rebel won’t let you down.

Design

The Moga Rebel followed the dual-wing Xbox One-style game controller with a sleek black finish. Both of the joysticks are smooth and comfortable, although it was weird not being able to click down on the joystick (called R3 or L3 on consoles) – though, this is a feature Moga representative told me isn’t supported by the iOS software.

Moga Rebel review

Another feature the Rebel has that reminds me of the Xbox controller is the nearly unusable D-Pad. It’s so bad that scrolling through title screens and menus is an absolute chore.

On the subject of missing features, tactile feedback in the form of rumble would’ve been nice too. Am I the only person that enjoys a little shake and rattle now and again?

Just like its Android counterpart, the Rebel has a plastic clamp that runs down the middle of the controller that, when flipped up, offers a solid lock to hold your iPhone. The clamp extends up to 3.5 inches, which means that it will even be able to support your brand-new iPhone 6 Plus.

The overall weight is a little light. In the hand, it feels like that one off-brand controller your friend had growing up, because he didn’t want to spend the money on a decent second controller.

The Rebel, however, at least has plenty of juice, thanks to its 680mAh rechargeable battery. For continuous gameplay, just plug-in the micro USB port on the back of the controller and you should be set for the duration of your session.

Support

The Moga Rebel has been designed to support anything with a lighting connector. Namely, that includes iPhone 5, iPhone 5C, iPhone 5S, iPad 4, iPad Mini, iPad Mini Retina Display, iPad Air, and the latest iPod Touch.

Not all of the games in the App Store are supported. Luckily, Moga offers a list of compatible apps on its website and should be launching a dedicated iOS app by the time the controller hits store shelves.

But, if you’re looking for some recommendations to try out of the box, check out Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, BioShock, Monster Hunter Unite, and Grand Theft Auto Vice City. They all work great with the controller.

Verdict

The Moga Rebel is easily the best full-sized MFi controller we’ve seen. With a decent build quality, solid battery life, and convenient phone clip, this controller is a solid investment. However, at basically $80, the Rebel is just that, an investment.

Unless you spend more time on your iPhone than you do on your console, I wouldn’t recommend dropping almost $100 on such an accessory. Though, if you do invest, you won’t be able to imagine gaming without it.

No more laying in bed and dropping the phone on my face while in between cutscenes. No more smudgy screen from my greasy Cheetos fingers. You have opposable thumbs, dammit, and you should use them the way gamers were meant to, with a controller.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Review: mini review: Moga Rebel

By Maxwell Barbanell

Review: mini review: Moga Rebel

Now that iOS 8 is here, there’s a lot to be excited about. Location settings, Airdrop functionality and to top it all off, an iOS-exclusive controller.

The Moga Pro has been out for Android gamers for a little over a year now, but iOS has been without a full-size controller this whole time. The Rebel is about to change that.

It’s a massive step in the right direction after Moga’s first attempt at a MFi controller, the Moga Ace, which TechRadar reviewed earlier this year. It may sound a bit expensive to the casual crowd at a hefty $79 (about £49, AU$88) price point. But if you’re looking to take your on-the-go gaming to the next level, the Rebel won’t let you down.

Design

The Moga Rebel followed the dual-wing Xbox One-style game controller with a sleek black finish. Both of the joysticks are smooth and comfortable, although it was weird not being able to click down on the joystick (called R3 or L3 on consoles) – though, this is a feature Moga representative told me isn’t supported by the iOS software.

Moga Rebel review

Another feature the Rebel has that reminds me of the Xbox controller is the nearly unusable D-Pad. It’s so bad that scrolling through title screens and menus is an absolute chore.

On the subject of missing features, tactile feedback in the form of rumble would’ve been nice too. Am I the only person that enjoys a little shake and rattle now and again?

Just like its Android counterpart, the Rebel has a plastic clamp that runs down the middle of the controller that, when flipped up, offers a solid lock to hold your iPhone. The clamp extends up to 3.5 inches, which means that it will even be able to support your brand-new iPhone 6 Plus.

The overall weight is a little light. In the hand, it feels like that one off-brand controller your friend had growing up, because he didn’t want to spend the money on a decent second controller.

The Rebel, however, at least has plenty of juice, thanks to its 680mAh rechargeable battery. For continuous gameplay, just plug-in the micro USB port on the back of the controller and you should be set for the duration of your session.

Support

The Moga Rebel has been designed to support anything with a lighting connector. Namely, that includes iPhone 5, iPhone 5C, iPhone 5S, iPad 4, iPad Mini, iPad Mini Retina Display, iPad Air, and the latest iPod Touch.

Not all of the games in the App Store are supported. Luckily, Moga offers a list of compatible apps on its website and should be launching a dedicated iOS app by the time the controller hits store shelves.

But, if you’re looking for some recommendations to try out of the box, check out Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, BioShock, Monster Hunter Unite, and Grand Theft Auto Vice City. They all work great with the controller.

Verdict

The Moga Rebel is easily the best full-sized MFi controller we’ve seen. With a decent build quality, solid battery life, and convenient phone clip, this controller is a solid investment. However, at basically $80, the Rebel is just that, an investment.

Unless you spend more time on your iPhone than you do on your console, I wouldn’t recommend dropping almost $100 on such an accessory. Though, if you do invest, you won’t be able to imagine gaming without it.

No more laying in bed and dropping the phone on my face while in between cutscenes. No more smudgy screen from my greasy Cheetos fingers. You have opposable thumbs, dammit, and you should use them the way gamers were meant to, with a controller.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Review: mini review: Moga Rebel

By Maxwell Barbanell

Review: mini review: Moga Rebel

Now that iOS 8 is here, there’s a lot to be excited about. Location settings, Airdrop functionality and to top it all off, an iOS-exclusive controller.

The Moga Pro has been out for Android gamers for a little over a year now, but iOS has been without a full-size controller this whole time. The Rebel is about to change that.

It’s a massive step in the right direction after Moga’s first attempt at a MFi controller, the Moga Ace, which TechRadar reviewed earlier this year. It may sound a bit expensive to the casual crowd at a hefty $79 (about £49, AU$88) price point. But if you’re looking to take your on-the-go gaming to the next level, the Rebel won’t let you down.

Design

The Moga Rebel followed the dual-wing Xbox One-style game controller with a sleek black finish. Both of the joysticks are smooth and comfortable, although it was weird not being able to click down on the joystick (called R3 or L3 on consoles) – though, this is a feature Moga representative told me isn’t supported by the iOS software.

Moga Rebel review

Another feature the Rebel has that reminds me of the Xbox controller is the nearly unusable D-Pad. It’s so bad that scrolling through title screens and menus is an absolute chore.

On the subject of missing features, tactile feedback in the form of rumble would’ve been nice too. Am I the only person that enjoys a little shake and rattle now and again?

Just like its Android counterpart, the Rebel has a plastic clamp that runs down the middle of the controller that, when flipped up, offers a solid lock to hold your iPhone. The clamp extends up to 3.5 inches, which means that it will even be able to support your brand-new iPhone 6 Plus.

The overall weight is a little light. In the hand, it feels like that one off-brand controller your friend had growing up, because he didn’t want to spend the money on a decent second controller.

The Rebel, however, at least has plenty of juice, thanks to its 680mAh rechargeable battery. For continuous gameplay, just plug-in the micro USB port on the back of the controller and you should be set for the duration of your session.

Support

The Moga Rebel has been designed to support anything with a lighting connector. Namely, that includes iPhone 5, iPhone 5C, iPhone 5S, iPad 4, iPad Mini, iPad Mini Retina Display, iPad Air, and the latest iPod Touch.

Not all of the games in the App Store are supported. Luckily, Moga offers a list of compatible apps on its website and should be launching a dedicated iOS app by the time the controller hits store shelves.

But, if you’re looking for some recommendations to try out of the box, check out Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, BioShock, Monster Hunter Unite, and Grand Theft Auto Vice City. They all work great with the controller.

Verdict

The Moga Rebel is easily the best full-sized MFi controller we’ve seen. With a decent build quality, solid battery life, and convenient phone clip, this controller is a solid investment. However, at basically $80, the Rebel is just that, an investment.

Unless you spend more time on your iPhone than you do on your console, I wouldn’t recommend dropping almost $100 on such an accessory. Though, if you do invest, you won’t be able to imagine gaming without it.

No more laying in bed and dropping the phone on my face while in between cutscenes. No more smudgy screen from my greasy Cheetos fingers. You have opposable thumbs, dammit, and you should use them the way gamers were meant to, with a controller.

…read more

Source:: android

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Samsung Galaxy A5 leaks point to mid-range device with a premium feel

By klee

Samsung Galaxy A5 leaks point to mid-range device with a premium feel

Samsung has been making big strides to improve the industrial design of its devices with metal-clad devices like the Galaxy Alpha and Galaxy Note 4.

The Korean smartphone maker isn’t stopping there as SamMobile claims the company will introduce a new Galaxy A5 that isn’t made of either metal or plastic. The new handset will purportedly have a body that “feels cold in the hand,” whatever that means.

SamMobile supposes the Galaxy A5 will be made of a unique material that will both keep the device’s cost down while maintaining a premium feel.

What that material is isn’t clear, though images of the phone point to it having at least some metal parts. You can clearly see metallic edges, which may contribute to the premium feel without covering the device completely.

Aside from the metallic rim, we can see the Galaxy A5 looks like an opaque white trapezoid with sharp edges as opposed to Samsung’s usual rounded-edge design.

Mid-range mystery

From the reported specs of the Galaxy A5 we can surmise it will be a mid-range device featuring a 5-inch HD Super AMOLED display. The phone is also said to be equipped with a Snapdragon 400 processor, a chip from yesteryear that powered many smartphones like the HTC One Mini.

Samsung, Samsung Galaxy A5

The phone will also supposedly sport a 13MP rear camera, 5-megapixel front-facing snapper, 16GB of storage, 2,330-mAh battery and the latest version of TouchWiz as with the Samsung Galaxy Note 4.

We’re sure to hear more about this mystery Samsung smartphone in the future, so stay tuned to this space for more.

  • Samsung is already making smartwatches big with the Gear S

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Samsung reportedly developing a Galaxy A5 made of neither metal or plastic

By klee

Samsung reportedly developing a Galaxy A5 made of neither metal or plastic

Samsung has been making big strides to improve the industrial design of its devices with metal-framed devices like the Galaxy Alpha and Galaxy Note 4.

The Korean smartphone maker isn’t stopping there as Sam Mobile claims the company will introduce a new Galaxy A5 that isn’t made of either metal or plastic. The new handset will purportedly have a body that “feels cold in the hand.”

Sam Mobile supposes the Galaxy A5 will be made of a unique material, which will both keep the device’s cost down while maintaining the device’s premium feel. One material that could fit the bill is glass. However, a few leaked images of the device shows it has metallic edges, which might throw out the theory the device won’t be made of metal.

Samsung, Samsung Galaxy A5,

Aside from the metallic edges we can see the phone looks like an opaque white trapezoid with sharp edges as opposed to Samsung’s usual rounded edge design.

Mid-range mystery

From the reported specs of the Galaxy A5 we can surmise it will be a mid-range device featuring a 5-inch HD Super AMOLED display. The phone is also said to be equipped with a Snapdragon 400 processor, a chip from yesteryear that powered many smartphones like the HTC One Mini.

Samsung, Samsung Galaxy A5

The phone will also supposedly sport a 13MP rear camera, 5-megapixel front-facing snapper, 16GB of storage, 2,330-mAh battery and the latest version of TouchWiz as with the Samsung Galaxy Note 4.

We’re sure to hear more about this mystery Samsung smartphone in the future, so stay tuned to this space for more.

  • Samsung is already making smartwatches big with the Gear S

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Screw Apple Pay: Samsung to team with PayPal for its watch payment plans?

By JR Bookwalter

Screw Apple Pay: Samsung to team with PayPal for its watch payment plans?

eBay owned PayPal was curiously left out of the impressive lineup of banking heavyweights during the Apple Pay launch last week, but a new report claims that may be because the payment giant is putting all of its eggs in Samsung’s basket instead.

Business Korea has word that Samsung plans to follow Apple down the smartwatch payment hole, and is said to be teaming up with one of the leading mobile payment services around to accomplish that goal.

According to an unnamed “high-ranking official” at Samsung, one of the manufacturer’s third-generation smartwatch devices will offer “simple payment functions” powered by PayPal, and protected by some form of “fingerprint identification technology.”

Ironically, PayPal – which publicly dissed Apple Pay only last week – isn’t even available in Samsung’s native country of South Korea. That’s not stopping this the smartwatch-based service, however, as it’s expected to debut in 25 other countries, eventually expanding to more than 50 around the globe.

Payment watch

Samsung is reportedly eyeing early 2015 for the launch of its payment-based smartwatch, presumably using the annual Mobile World Congress event as a springboard for doing so.

Perhaps not-so coincidentally, early next year is also the same time-frame Cupertino has already staked out for its own Apple Watch, which will be capable of making contact-less payments even when not connected to a compatible iPhone.

Biometric expert Synaptics will reportedly provide fingerprint verification technology for Samsung’s future smartwatch, part of the company’s Fast Identity Online Alliance which also includes PayPal, Bank of America, Visa and Google among its ranks.

Synaptics Chief Executive Officer Richard Bergman confirmed, “wearable devices with fingerprint verification and relevant solutions will be released early next year,” suggesting Samsung and Apple won’t be alone in duking it out for wearable payment domination.

  • Find out if Apple truly goes big in our review of iPhone 6 Plus!

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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PayPal rumored to buddy up with Samsung for smartwatch payments

By JR Bookwalter

PayPal rumored to buddy up with Samsung for smartwatch payments

eBay owned PayPal was curiously left out of the impressive lineup of banking heavyweights during the Apple Pay launch last week, but a new report claims that may be because the payment giant is putting all of its eggs in Samsung’s basket instead.

Business Korea reported yesterday that Samsung Electronics plans to follow Apple down the smartwatch payment hole, and is said to be teaming up with one of the leading mobile payment services around to accomplish that goal.

According to an unnamed “high-ranking official” at Samsung, one of the manufacturer’s third-generation smartwatch devices will offer “simple payment functions” powered by PayPal, and protected by some form of “fingerprint identification technology.”

Ironically, PayPal – who publicly dissed Apple Pay only last week – is not even available in Samsung’s native country of South Korea, although the smartwatch based service is expected to debut in 25 other countries, eventually expanding to more than 50 around the globe.

Payment watch

Samsung is reportedly eyeing early 2015 for the launch of its payment-based smartwatch, presumably using the annual Mobile World Congress event as a springboard for doing so.

Perhaps not-so coincidentally, early next year is also the same timeframe Cupertino has already staked out for its own Apple Watch, which will be capable of making contactless payments even without being connected to a compatible iPhone.

Biometric expert Synaptics will reportedly provide fingerprint verification technology for Samsung’s future smartwatch, part of the company’s Fast Identity Online Alliance which also includes PayPal, Bank of America, Visa and Google among its ranks.

Synaptics Chief Executive Officer Richard Bergman confirmed that “wearable devices with fingerprint verification and relevant solutions will be released early next year,” suggesting that Samsung and Apple won’t be alone in duking it out for wearable payment domination.

  • Find out if Apple truly goes big in our review of iPhone 6 Plus!

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Amazon opens pre-orders for Samsung Galaxy Note 4

By Michael Rougeau

Amazon opens pre-orders for Samsung Galaxy Note 4

You won’t have to go straight through a carrier if you want to pre-order the Samsung Galaxy Note 4, as Amazon has just announced its own pre-order dates for the newest phablet.

Amazon is taking Galaxy Note 4 pre-orders for $300 with a contract starting today for AT&T and Verizon customers and beginning September 26 for Sprint users.

T-Mobile fans, it seems, will have to go directly to the carrier, but others will have the option to get either the black or white version of the Note 4 straight from Amazon.

Unfortunately the one thing Amazon hasn’t been specific about is when the Note 4 will actually ship out, with only a “mid-October” expectation.

Phabletous

Those hoping to grab the Galaxy Note 4 directly from their carriers have plenty of options as well.

AT&T customers can pre-order the Note 4 as of today, with the phone expected to ship out around October 14. The carrier is selling it for $300 on-contract, $41.30 or $34.42 per month on an AT&T Next plan, or $826 without a contract.

Verizon’s own Galaxy Note 4 pre-orders are available today as well, with the same price of $300 on-contract.

T-Mobile pre-orders begin September 24, with the phone releasing online and in stores October 17 for 24 monthly payments of $31.24.

And Sprint hasn’t yet divulged its own Note 4 pre-order details, though Sprint customers can of course just head to Amazon on September 26.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Review: Lenovo B50-30

By Mike Jennings

Review: Lenovo B50-30

Introduction and features

Lenovo has designed this laptop for low intensity tasks, so we expected it to arrive with a budget price – but we didn’t expect it to cost just £199 (about $334, AU$360). That makes it one of the most affordable notebooks we’ve reviewed.

That eye-catching price undercuts every rival. We thought the Toshiba Satellite C50 was cheap, but it costs £240 (about $403, AU$435), and HP’s Pavilion TouchSmart 15-n070sa costs a comparatively stratospheric £350 (about $589, AU$634).

The Lenovo doesn’t look like such an affordable portable. The matte plastic exterior is subtle, and the metal-effect logo along with the green dotted power button look smart. It’s plain, but it’s not nasty.

Lenovo B50 keyboard

The B50 trades blows with rivals in terms of its dimensions, too: the 2.15kg weight (about 4.7 pounds) is less than both competitors, and the B50’s 25mm-thick (about 0.98 inches) body sits between the thinner HP and chunkier Toshiba. It’s thin and light enough to carry day-to-day, although we’d always use a protective sleeve – the plastic looks smart, but it’s flimsier than the HP and Toshiba laptops.

Impressive ergonomics

Despite the low price, Lenovo has included a good keyboard. It’s a Scrabble-tile unit with a numberpad and a sensible layout, and it’s comfortable to use – the keys have good travel, and their action is responsive and soft. It’s as good as anything else we’ve typed on at this price, including the Toshiba.

Lenovo B50 keyboard 2

The trackpad is reasonable. It’s a little larger than the Toshiba’s effort, and the buttons require light touches and little pressure to use. More expensive laptops have better ergonomics than the Lenovo – we’d prefer a snappier typing action and firmer buttons – but there’s enough quality here to get work and web browsing done without difficulty.

The sub-£200 Lenovo is powered by an Intel Celeron N2830, which uses the same Bay Trail architecture that’s included in modern Atom chips. Its two cores are clocked between 2.16GHz and 2.41GHz, and the chip has a basic Intel HD Graphics core that runs at a top speed of 750MHz.

Cut corners

This is where the Lenovo’s budget bites. Its two rivals use mid-range AMD Kabini APUs. They’re both clocked to slower speeds than the Lenovo’s Intel silicon, but have four cores and more cache. It’s the same story in graphics, where the AMD chips have lesser clock speeds but a more impressive Radeon architecture.

Lenovo B50 trackpad

There’s just 4GB of RAM and a 320GB hard disk, and networking is restricted to a single-band 802.11n Wi-Fi chip alongside Bluetooth 4.0 and Gigabit Ethernet. There’s one USB 3.0 port around the Lenovo’s edges, but the interior is more impressive – there’s a spare memory socket, and the main components are all accessible.

Performance

  • PCMark 8 Home: 1,216
  • PCMark 8 Home battery: 3 hours 57 minutes
  • 3DMark Ice Storm: 15,417
  • 3DMark Cloud Gate: 1,205
  • 3DMark Fire Strike: wouldn’t run
  • Cinebench R11.5: CPU: 0.68; Graphics: 6.12fps
  • Cinebench R15: CPU: 35cb; Graphics: 5.34fps

The low-end Celeron processor won’t win any speed awards. In PC Mark 8’s Home benchmark it scored 1,216 points, which is slower than the two AMD-powered systems. That disappointing benchmark result carried over to real-world use, where we could only complete basic tasks – more intensive software saw the Lenovo grind to a halt. Loading times were poor, with software struggling to boot quickly in desktop mode and the Start screen pausing before it appeared.

Lenovo B50 profile 1

The sluggish performance continued in Cinebench tests. In version 11.5 of the application, the Lenovo’s CPU score of 0.68 was significantly slower than the 1.13 scored by the HP Pavilion TouchSmart 15-n070sa and the 1.97 of the Toshiba Satellite C50.

This is no gaming system, either. In 3DMark’s easiest benchmark, Ice Storm, the Celeron’s Intel HD Graphics core stumbled to 15,417 points – almost 7,000 behind the HP, and less than half the speed of the Toshiba. The gap was maintained in the harder Cloud Gate benchmark, and the low-end Lenovo couldn’t complete the Fire Strike test. This machine will only handle old and basic games.

Lenovo B50 rear

Poor display

The budget shows when the 1,366 x 768 non-touch screen is considered, too. The 207cd/m2 brightness level is low, so everything looks dim, and the black level of 0.63cd/m2 is just as bad – blacks just don’t look deep. The 328:1 contrast ratio isn’t able to match the superior Toshiba, and it means that there’s a lack of depth and brightness across the entire range.

The average Delta E of 9.95 and colour temperature of 7,547K are poor. The former figure means that colours aren’t accurate, and the latter means that images are hampered by colder tones.

The Lenovo’s poor panel is only good enough for web browsing and basic work. Toshiba’s laptop has a better screen thanks to improved brightness, contrast and colour accuracy.

Lenovo B50 profile 2

The screen’s lack of quality and resolution hamper its potential, and it’s not helped by awful audio. No part of the range impresses; the top-end is tinny, and the mid-range lacks bite, and there’s barely any bass. It doesn’t help that songs and movies sound squashed together, too, with no depth.

The one saving grace came in battery benchmarks. The Lenovo lasted for 3 hours 57 minutes in PCMark 8’s Home test with the screen at 100% brightness and High Performance mode activated. That’s almost an hour ahead of the Toshiba and more than thirty minutes longer than the HP. The battery lasted for just over five hours with the screen dimmed and Power Saver mode activated, which is reasonable, but this remains a laptop that’ll only manage a half-day away from a plug.

Verdict

The Lenovo’s main attraction is its price, but it’s surprisingly impressive in other areas. It’s …read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Review: Lenovo B50-30

By Mike Jennings

Review: Lenovo B50-30

Introduction and features

Lenovo has designed this laptop for low intensity tasks, so we expected it to arrive with a budget price – but we didn’t expect it to cost just £199 (about $334, AU$360). That makes it one of the most affordable notebooks we’ve reviewed.

That eye-catching price undercuts every rival. We thought the Toshiba Satellite C50 was cheap, but it costs £240 (about $403, AU$435), and HP’s Pavilion TouchSmart 15-n070sa costs a comparatively stratospheric £350 (about $589, AU$634).

The Lenovo doesn’t look like such an affordable portable. The matte plastic exterior is subtle, and the metal-effect logo along with the green dotted power button look smart. It’s plain, but it’s not nasty.

Lenovo B50 keyboard

The B50 trades blows with rivals in terms of its dimensions, too: the 2.15kg weight (about 4.7 pounds) is less than both competitors, and the B50’s 25mm-thick (about 0.98 inches) body sits between the thinner HP and chunkier Toshiba. It’s thin and light enough to carry day-to-day, although we’d always use a protective sleeve – the plastic looks smart, but it’s flimsier than the HP and Toshiba laptops.

Impressive ergonomics

Despite the low price, Lenovo has included a good keyboard. It’s a Scrabble-tile unit with a numberpad and a sensible layout, and it’s comfortable to use – the keys have good travel, and their action is responsive and soft. It’s as good as anything else we’ve typed on at this price, including the Toshiba.

Lenovo B50 keyboard 2

The trackpad is reasonable. It’s a little larger than the Toshiba’s effort, and the buttons require light touches and little pressure to use. More expensive laptops have better ergonomics than the Lenovo – we’d prefer a snappier typing action and firmer buttons – but there’s enough quality here to get work and web browsing done without difficulty.

The sub-£200 Lenovo is powered by an Intel Celeron N2830, which uses the same Bay Trail architecture that’s included in modern Atom chips. Its two cores are clocked between 2.16GHz and 2.41GHz, and the chip has a basic Intel HD Graphics core that runs at a top speed of 750MHz.

Cut corners

This is where the Lenovo’s budget bites. Its two rivals use mid-range AMD Kabini APUs. They’re both clocked to slower speeds than the Lenovo’s Intel silicon, but have four cores and more cache. It’s the same story in graphics, where the AMD chips have lesser clock speeds but a more impressive Radeon architecture.

Lenovo B50 trackpad

There’s just 4GB of RAM and a 320GB hard disk, and networking is restricted to a single-band 802.11n Wi-Fi chip alongside Bluetooth 4.0 and Gigabit Ethernet. There’s one USB 3.0 port around the Lenovo’s edges, but the interior is more impressive – there’s a spare memory socket, and the main components are all accessible.

Performance

  • PCMark 8 Home: 1,216
  • PCMark 8 Home battery: 3 hours 57 minutes
  • 3DMark Ice Storm: 15,417
  • 3DMark Cloud Gate: 1,205
  • 3DMark Fire Strike: wouldn’t run
  • Cinebench R11.5: CPU: 0.68; Graphics: 6.12fps
  • Cinebench R15: CPU: 35cb; Graphics: 5.34fps

The low-end Celeron processor won’t win any speed awards. In PC Mark 8’s Home benchmark it scored 1,216 points, which is slower than the two AMD-powered systems. That disappointing benchmark result carried over to real-world use, where we could only complete basic tasks – more intensive software saw the Lenovo grind to a halt. Loading times were poor, with software struggling to boot quickly in desktop mode and the Start screen pausing before it appeared.

Lenovo B50 profile 1

The sluggish performance continued in Cinebench tests. In version 11.5 of the application, the Lenovo’s CPU score of 0.68 was significantly slower than the 1.13 scored by the HP Pavilion TouchSmart 15-n070sa and the 1.97 of the Toshiba Satellite C50.

This is no gaming system, either. In 3DMark’s easiest benchmark, Ice Storm, the Celeron’s Intel HD Graphics core stumbled to 15,417 points – almost 7,000 behind the HP, and less than half the speed of the Toshiba. The gap was maintained in the harder Cloud Gate benchmark, and the low-end Lenovo couldn’t complete the Fire Strike test. This machine will only handle old and basic games.

Lenovo B50 rear

Poor display

The budget shows when the 1,366 x 768 non-touch screen is considered, too. The 207cd/m2 brightness level is low, so everything looks dim, and the black level of 0.63cd/m2 is just as bad – blacks just don’t look deep. The 328:1 contrast ratio isn’t able to match the superior Toshiba, and it means that there’s a lack of depth and brightness across the entire range.

The average Delta E of 9.95 and colour temperature of 7,547K are poor. The former figure means that colours aren’t accurate, and the latter means that images are hampered by colder tones.

The Lenovo’s poor panel is only good enough for web browsing and basic work. Toshiba’s laptop has a better screen thanks to improved brightness, contrast and colour accuracy.

Lenovo B50 profile 2

The screen’s lack of quality and resolution hamper its potential, and it’s not helped by awful audio. No part of the range impresses; the top-end is tinny, and the mid-range lacks bite, and there’s barely any bass. It doesn’t help that songs and movies sound squashed together, too, with no depth.

The one saving grace came in battery benchmarks. The Lenovo lasted for 3 hours 57 minutes in PCMark 8’s Home test with the screen at 100% brightness and High Performance mode activated. That’s almost an hour ahead of the Toshiba and more than thirty minutes longer than the HP. The battery lasted for just over five hours with the screen dimmed and Power Saver mode activated, which is reasonable, but this remains a laptop that’ll only manage a half-day away from a plug.

Verdict

The Lenovo’s main attraction is its price, but it’s surprisingly impressive in other areas. It’s …read more

Source:: android