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Hands-on review: Kindle Voyage

By Gareth Beavis

Hands-on review: Kindle Voyage

Is the ereader dying? It appears not if Amazon’s latest punt, and the reactions to it I’ve had, are anything to go by.

This is an expensive device indeed, coming in at £170 compared to the sub £100 options from rivals (and Amazon itself, with the basic Kindle range).

But the Kindle Voyage isn’t meant to compete – it’s there to lead and be an attractive option for those that love their reading on a commute and are willing to invest a little more.

Kindle Voyage review

I have to say that in my early days of use with the Voyage, I’m already loathe to give it up. It’s still just an ereader at the heart, and I had not problem with my Paperwhite at all. The brigher screen was clear and crisp, and the response time.

But Amazon has made the Voyage clearer, brighter and faster to interact with, and I’ve enjoyed all those elements.

Kindle Voyage review

The smaller size is nice too, enabling me to slip into a front pocket even with a cover on. (The origami cover, which annoyingly isn’t bundled for the cost, is brilliant as a little stand / smart cover to unlock the ereader).

It’s a little on the small side if I had any criticism, but the screen is so legible I had no issue day to day. I also really like that the display and frame are now one single pane of strengthened glass, making a very clean and smooth front to the Voyage.

Kindle Voyage review

The other big change is the ability to turn the page using the bezel once more, although this time it’s through touch-sensitivity rather than a physical button.

Weirdly these buttons don’t work well for me at all. But then again a few millimetres to the left or right there’s a screen that I can tap and have the pages turn every time. It’s annoying that the buttons are accurate at all though.

Kindle Voyage review

There are myriad new features coming to the interface that make the Kindle Voyage more powerful for reading than ever before, but they’ll be coming to the Paperwhite and family too soon, so aren’t really key selling points.

Kindle Voyage review

I’ll dig into these more in the full review to see if they really enhance the reading experience, or are just gimmicks to make it seem like Amazon ‘gets’ reading more than you do.

Early verdict

The Kindle Voyage is a premium device with a higher cost associated. However, like the smartwatches it shares a price tag with, you can make a real case for this as a Christmas gift. It makes reading nicer.

No matter how easy it is to read on a tablet or smartphone, there’s no substitute for the feel of a real book. But the Amazon Kindle Voyage comes much closer than anything before, and it’s much nicer to hold and carry around.

…read more

Source:: android

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Hands-on review: Kindle Voyage

By Gareth Beavis

Hands-on review: Kindle Voyage

Is the ereader dying? It appears not if Amazon’s latest punt, and the reactions to it I’ve had, are anything to go by.

This is an expensive device indeed, coming in at £170 compared to the sub £100 options from rivals (and Amazon itself, with the basic Kindle range).

But the Kindle Voyage isn’t meant to compete – it’s there to lead and be an attractive option for those that love their reading on a commute and are willing to invest a little more.

Kindle Voyage review

I have to say that in my early days of use with the Voyage, I’m already loathe to give it up. It’s still just an ereader at the heart, and I had not problem with my Paperwhite at all. The brigher screen was clear and crisp, and the response time.

But Amazon has made the Voyage clearer, brighter and faster to interact with, and I’ve enjoyed all those elements.

Kindle Voyage review

The smaller size is nice too, enabling me to slip into a front pocket even with a cover on. (The origami cover, which annoyingly isn’t bundled for the cost, is brilliant as a little stand / smart cover to unlock the ereader).

It’s a little on the small side if I had any criticism, but the screen is so legible I had no issue day to day. I also really like that the display and frame are now one single pane of strengthened glass, making a very clean and smooth front to the Voyage.

Kindle Voyage review

The other big change is the ability to turn the page using the bezel once more, although this time it’s through touch-sensitivity rather than a physical button.

Weirdly these buttons don’t work well for me at all. But then again a few millimetres to the left or right there’s a screen that I can tap and have the pages turn every time. It’s annoying that the buttons are accurate at all though.

Kindle Voyage review

There are myriad new features coming to the interface that make the Kindle Voyage more powerful for reading than ever before, but they’ll be coming to the Paperwhite and family too soon, so aren’t really key selling points.

Kindle Voyage review

I’ll dig into these more in the full review to see if they really enhance the reading experience, or are just gimmicks to make it seem like Amazon ‘gets’ reading more than you do.

Early verdict

The Kindle Voyage is a premium device with a higher cost associated. However, like the smartwatches it shares a price tag with, you can make a real case for this as a Christmas gift. It makes reading nicer.

No matter how easy it is to read on a tablet or smartphone, there’s no substitute for the feel of a real book. But the Amazon Kindle Voyage comes much closer than anything before, and it’s much nicer to hold and carry around.

…read more

Source:: android

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Hands-on review: Kindle Voyage

By Gareth Beavis

Hands-on review: Kindle Voyage

Is the ereader dying? It appears not if Amazon’s latest punt, and the reactions to it I’ve had, are anything to go by.

This is an expensive device indeed, coming in at £170 compared to the sub £100 options from rivals (and Amazon itself, with the basic Kindle range).

But the Kindle Voyage isn’t meant to compete – it’s there to lead and be an attractive option for those that love their reading on a commute and are willing to invest a little more.

Kindle Voyage review

I have to say that in my early days of use with the Voyage, I’m already loathe to give it up. It’s still just an ereader at the heart, and I had not problem with my Paperwhite at all. The brigher screen was clear and crisp, and the response time.

But Amazon has made the Voyage clearer, brighter and faster to interact with, and I’ve enjoyed all those elements.

Kindle Voyage review

The smaller size is nice too, enabling me to slip into a front pocket even with a cover on. (The origami cover, which annoyingly isn’t bundled for the cost, is brilliant as a little stand / smart cover to unlock the ereader).

It’s a little on the small side if I had any criticism, but the screen is so legible I had no issue day to day. I also really like that the display and frame are now one single pane of strengthened glass, making a very clean and smooth front to the Voyage.

Kindle Voyage review

The other big change is the ability to turn the page using the bezel once more, although this time it’s through touch-sensitivity rather than a physical button.

Weirdly these buttons don’t work well for me at all. But then again a few millimetres to the left or right there’s a screen that I can tap and have the pages turn every time. It’s annoying that the buttons are accurate at all though.

Kindle Voyage review

There are myriad new features coming to the interface that make the Kindle Voyage more powerful for reading than ever before, but they’ll be coming to the Paperwhite and family too soon, so aren’t really key selling points.

Kindle Voyage review

I’ll dig into these more in the full review to see if they really enhance the reading experience, or are just gimmicks to make it seem like Amazon ‘gets’ reading more than you do.

Early verdict

The Kindle Voyage is a premium device with a higher cost associated. However, like the smartwatches it shares a price tag with, you can make a real case for this as a Christmas gift. It makes reading nicer.

No matter how easy it is to read on a tablet or smartphone, there’s no substitute for the feel of a real book. But the Amazon Kindle Voyage comes much closer than anything before, and it’s much nicer to hold and carry around.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Hands-on review: Nexus 9

By Gareth Beavis

Hands-on review: Nexus 9

The Nexus 9 by HTC is a tablet that’s been a long time coming. It’s the updated Nexus 7, it’s the rebooted Nexus 10, and it’s the Nexus 8 too.

The tablet seems to have been through a number of internal iterations, mostly because the tablet market has evolved so rapidly of late. It saw Apple enter the mini tablet space, and then decide to effectively pull out by choosing to bring the most minimal updates possible to the iPad mini 3.

So is the Nexus 9 the silver bullet Google needs to keep up the Android tablet charge? The Android market share is increasing, but at the cheaper end of the market where the quality isn’t always as high.

So teaming with HTC to offer an high-power, between-big-and-little tablet seems to be a good move if Google wants to kickstart the lust for the top end tablet.

Nexus 9 review

It’s got some might competition – the Samsung Tab S is a rather lovely device in the Android space, and comes in 10.5- and 8.4-inch sizes, to flank this 9-inch (well, 8.9-inch) option. There’s obviously the powerful and sleek iPad Air 2, and even Sony’s Z3 Compact Tablet is a decent choice.

Nexus 9 review

So what’s the big deal with the HTC Nexus 9? With a price tag of £319 ($399, about AU$450) for the 16GB option, and £399 ($479, about AU$545) for the bigger 32GB choice, this isn’t the cheap Nexii we’re used to. It’s a powerhouse with some of the best internals on the market.

Design

The design is clearly led by HTC here, building on Asus’ rubberised Nexus 7 and adding in some premium finishes. The larger device – which is now much wider by choosing a 4:3 screen ratio, rather than the 16:9 widescreen that’s brilliant for movies – has the same feel to the back, but now comes with a metallic rim.

Nexus 9 review

This aids grip as well as improving the aesthetics of the tablet – and while in the black version it’s harder to notice, the chamfered silver edges on the white (ish) model looks a lot more high-end.

There’s no microSD slot here, which I’ve come to expect on most Android tablets, meaning the extra cost of the 32GB model looks like the only way to safeguard yourself from larger apps or big HD movie libraries. The battery seems large enough at 6700mAh, but with the higher-res 2K screen it might need all that juice.

Nexus 9 review

Nexus 9 review

The overall design of the Nexus 9 means that, unless you’re blessed with massive hands, this is a two-palmed device to use easily. That’s not a real problem as it’s pretty light to hold, but I did miss the ability from the Nexus 7.

Speaking of the screen, it’s a decent effort indeed without being mind blowing. It’s certainly high-res enough to match the iPad Air 2 in terms of pixel count, which means by having a 0.8-inch smaller display increases the sharpness.

Nexus 9 review

I didn’t notice anything looking particularly crisp in general use, but then coming from using both the iPad Air 2 and mini 3 from recent reviews, perhaps that’s because my eyes are used to such clarity.

That said, I was very impressed with the deep blacks and overall contrast ratio of the screen, which meant I certainly had no gripes watching high-res YouTube clips during my testing time.

Interface

The Nexus 9 I was using was a developer’s version of Android 5 / Lollipop, which means I was essentially playing with Android L.

That said, it’s a really nifty upgrade and it combines well with the larger and wider screen size on offer. Loading TechRadar on the Chrome browser wasn’t the fastest experience, with a few lags with swiping, but that’s very possibly down to not being final build.

Nexus 9 review

Everything else was swift and I enjoyed the new UI touches. The icons that twist around as you drag the notifications bar from the top of the screen, the unobtrusive windows asking which apps you’d like to use at the bottom, contextual menus – all looking very slick.

Nexus 9 review

The real downside I noted – and it’s not a big one, given it’s not a key part of the tablet experience – is the camera. Like every Nexus device, this seems more like a proving ground for the software than allowing users to take great photos.

Nexus 9 review

The Lens Blur effects just didn’t work (again, possibly due to early software) and the overall snap quality wasn’t high at all. The controls were nice and simple though, with swipes left and right getting you into your gallery or letting you choose new photo modes.

Nexus 9 review

There’s even the chance to up the control level to include extra manual controls, so it’s a nice mix for the casual and more professional user – although I need to see it with a better sensor, optics and, well, not on a tablet.

CPU

The big thing to note here is that HTC has switched away from Qualcomm here to go with an Nvidia K1 chipset. This probably won’t mean a lot to many users, save to say it really improves the speed under the finger when flicking through the Nexus 9 and making the graphical prowess that much better.

Nexus 9 review

However, it makes the new tablet a good bet for the future, as with a 64-bit architecture in the tablet and available on the new iteration of Android, the two together will result in more powerful and useful apps.

Nexus 9 review

That said, there’s only 2GB of RAM at the heart of the Nexus 9, which means it won’t really be able to take advantage of the 64-bit ability, but will have some slight …read more

Source:: android

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Hands-on review: Nexus 9

By Gareth Beavis

Hands-on review: Nexus 9

The Nexus 9 by HTC is a tablet that’s been a long time coming. It’s the updated Nexus 7, it’s the rebooted Nexus 10, and it’s the Nexus 8 too.

The tablet seems to have been through a number of internal iterations, mostly because the tablet market has evolved so rapidly of late. It saw Apple enter the mini tablet space, and then decide to effectively pull out by choosing to bring the most minimal updates possible to the iPad mini 3.

So is the Nexus 9 the silver bullet Google needs to keep up the Android tablet charge? The Android market share is increasing, but at the cheaper end of the market where the quality isn’t always as high.

So teaming with HTC to offer an high-power, between-big-and-little tablet seems to be a good move if Google wants to kickstart the lust for the top end tablet.

Nexus 9 review

It’s got some might competition – the Samsung Tab S is a rather lovely device in the Android space, and comes in 10.5- and 8.4-inch sizes, to flank this 9-inch (well, 8.9-inch) option. There’s obviously the powerful and sleek iPad Air 2, and even Sony’s Z3 Compact Tablet is a decent choice.

Nexus 9 review

So what’s the big deal with the HTC Nexus 9? With a price tag of £319 ($399, about AU$450) for the 16GB option, and £399 ($479, about AU$545) for the bigger 32GB choice, this isn’t the cheap Nexii we’re used to. It’s a powerhouse with some of the best internals on the market.

Design

The design is clearly led by HTC here, building on Asus’ rubberised Nexus 7 and adding in some premium finishes. The larger device – which is now much wider by choosing a 4:3 screen ratio, rather than the 16:9 widescreen that’s brilliant for movies – has the same feel to the back, but now comes with a metallic rim.

Nexus 9 review

This aids grip as well as improving the aesthetics of the tablet – and while in the black version it’s harder to notice, the chamfered silver edges on the white (ish) model looks a lot more high-end.

There’s no microSD slot here, which I’ve come to expect on most Android tablets, meaning the extra cost of the 32GB model looks like the only way to safeguard yourself from larger apps or big HD movie libraries. The battery seems large enough at 6700mAh, but with the higher-res 2K screen it might need all that juice.

Nexus 9 review

Nexus 9 review

The overall design of the Nexus 9 means that, unless you’re blessed with massive hands, this is a two-palmed device to use easily. That’s not a real problem as it’s pretty light to hold, but I did miss the ability from the Nexus 7.

Speaking of the screen, it’s a decent effort indeed without being mind blowing. It’s certainly high-res enough to match the iPad Air 2 in terms of pixel count, which means by having a 0.8-inch smaller display increases the sharpness.

Nexus 9 review

I didn’t notice anything looking particularly crisp in general use, but then coming from using both the iPad Air 2 and mini 3 from recent reviews, perhaps that’s because my eyes are used to such clarity.

That said, I was very impressed with the deep blacks and overall contrast ratio of the screen, which meant I certainly had no gripes watching high-res YouTube clips during my testing time.

Interface

The Nexus 9 I was using was a developer’s version of Android 5 / Lollipop, which means I was essentially playing with Android L.

That said, it’s a really nifty upgrade and it combines well with the larger and wider screen size on offer. Loading TechRadar on the Chrome browser wasn’t the fastest experience, with a few lags with swiping, but that’s very possibly down to not being final build.

Nexus 9 review

Everything else was swift and I enjoyed the new UI touches. The icons that twist around as you drag the notifications bar from the top of the screen, the unobtrusive windows asking which apps you’d like to use at the bottom, contextual menus – all looking very slick.

Nexus 9 review

The real downside I noted – and it’s not a big one, given it’s not a key part of the tablet experience – is the camera. Like every Nexus device, this seems more like a proving ground for the software than allowing users to take great photos.

Nexus 9 review

The Lens Blur effects just didn’t work (again, possibly due to early software) and the overall snap quality wasn’t high at all. The controls were nice and simple though, with swipes left and right getting you into your gallery or letting you choose new photo modes.

Nexus 9 review

There’s even the chance to up the control level to include extra manual controls, so it’s a nice mix for the casual and more professional user – although I need to see it with a better sensor, optics and, well, not on a tablet.

CPU

The big thing to note here is that HTC has switched away from Qualcomm here to go with an Nvidia K1 chipset. This probably won’t mean a lot to many users, save to say it really improves the speed under the finger when flicking through the Nexus 9 and making the graphical prowess that much better.

Nexus 9 review

However, it makes the new tablet a good bet for the future, as with a 64-bit architecture in the tablet and available on the new iteration of Android, the two together will result in more powerful and useful apps.

Nexus 9 review

That said, there’s only 2GB of RAM at the heart of the Nexus 9, which means it won’t really be able to take advantage of the 64-bit ability, but will have some slight …read more

Source:: android

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Hands-on review: Nexus 9

By Gareth Beavis

Hands-on review: Nexus 9

The Nexus 9 by HTC is a tablet that’s been a long time coming. It’s the updated Nexus 7, it’s the rebooted Nexus 10, and it’s the Nexus 8 too.

The tablet seems to have been through a number of internal iterations, mostly because the tablet market has evolved so rapidly of late. It saw Apple enter the mini tablet space, and then decide to effectively pull out by choosing to bring the most minimal updates possible to the iPad mini 3.

So is the Nexus 9 the silver bullet Google needs to keep up the Android tablet charge? The Android market share is increasing, but at the cheaper end of the market where the quality isn’t always as high.

So teaming with HTC to offer an high-power, between-big-and-little tablet seems to be a good move if Google wants to kickstart the lust for the top end tablet.

Nexus 9 review

It’s got some might competition – the Samsung Tab S is a rather lovely device in the Android space, and comes in 10.5- and 8.4-inch sizes, to flank this 9-inch (well, 8.9-inch) option. There’s obviously the powerful and sleek iPad Air 2, and even Sony’s Z3 Compact Tablet is a decent choice.

Nexus 9 review

So what’s the big deal with the HTC Nexus 9? With a price tag of £319 ($399, about AU$450) for the 16GB option, and £399 ($479, about AU$545) for the bigger 32GB choice, this isn’t the cheap Nexii we’re used to. It’s a powerhouse with some of the best internals on the market.

Design

The design is clearly led by HTC here, building on Asus’ rubberised Nexus 7 and adding in some premium finishes. The larger device – which is now much wider by choosing a 4:3 screen ratio, rather than the 16:9 widescreen that’s brilliant for movies – has the same feel to the back, but now comes with a metallic rim.

Nexus 9 review

This aids grip as well as improving the aesthetics of the tablet – and while in the black version it’s harder to notice, the chamfered silver edges on the white (ish) model looks a lot more high-end.

There’s no microSD slot here, which I’ve come to expect on most Android tablets, meaning the extra cost of the 32GB model looks like the only way to safeguard yourself from larger apps or big HD movie libraries. The battery seems large enough at 6700mAh, but with the higher-res 2K screen it might need all that juice.

Nexus 9 review

Nexus 9 review

The overall design of the Nexus 9 means that, unless you’re blessed with massive hands, this is a two-palmed device to use easily. That’s not a real problem as it’s pretty light to hold, but I did miss the ability from the Nexus 7.

Speaking of the screen, it’s a decent effort indeed without being mind blowing. It’s certainly high-res enough to match the iPad Air 2 in terms of pixel count, which means by having a 0.8-inch smaller display increases the sharpness.

Nexus 9 review

I didn’t notice anything looking particularly crisp in general use, but then coming from using both the iPad Air 2 and mini 3 from recent reviews, perhaps that’s because my eyes are used to such clarity.

That said, I was very impressed with the deep blacks and overall contrast ratio of the screen, which meant I certainly had no gripes watching high-res YouTube clips during my testing time.

Interface

The Nexus 9 I was using was a developer’s version of Android 5 / Lollipop, which means I was essentially playing with Android L.

That said, it’s a really nifty upgrade and it combines well with the larger and wider screen size on offer. Loading TechRadar on the Chrome browser wasn’t the fastest experience, with a few lags with swiping, but that’s very possibly down to not being final build.

Nexus 9 review

Everything else was swift and I enjoyed the new UI touches. The icons that twist around as you drag the notifications bar from the top of the screen, the unobtrusive windows asking which apps you’d like to use at the bottom, contextual menus – all looking very slick.

Nexus 9 review

The real downside I noted – and it’s not a big one, given it’s not a key part of the tablet experience – is the camera. Like every Nexus device, this seems more like a proving ground for the software than allowing users to take great photos.

Nexus 9 review

The Lens Blur effects just didn’t work (again, possibly due to early software) and the overall snap quality wasn’t high at all. The controls were nice and simple though, with swipes left and right getting you into your gallery or letting you choose new photo modes.

Nexus 9 review

There’s even the chance to up the control level to include extra manual controls, so it’s a nice mix for the casual and more professional user – although I need to see it with a better sensor, optics and, well, not on a tablet.

CPU

The big thing to note here is that HTC has switched away from Qualcomm here to go with an Nvidia K1 chipset. This probably won’t mean a lot to many users, save to say it really improves the speed under the finger when flicking through the Nexus 9 and making the graphical prowess that much better.

Nexus 9 review

However, it makes the new tablet a good bet for the future, as with a 64-bit architecture in the tablet and available on the new iteration of Android, the two together will result in more powerful and useful apps.

Nexus 9 review

That said, there’s only 2GB of RAM at the heart of the Nexus 9, which means it won’t really be able to take advantage of the 64-bit ability, but will have some slight …read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Industry voice: To bring your own device is to bring your own risks

By Thiruvadinathan A.

Industry voice: To bring your own device is to bring your own risks

The world knows that BYOD trend is here to stay. And enterprises must embrace it. Like any other technology, BYOD is not without its usual hype and is an evolving.

BYOD also implies BYOR, Bring Your Own Risks. Enterprises around the world continue to struggle to protect their information assets through consistent application of security policies even on devices owned by them. Business requirements, end user experience, employee friendly policies, operational overheads tend to override security risks especially when resources are hard to come-by.

Such approaches are not risk-based but risk-accepted approaches, which means inconsistent and flexible implementation of policies and other controls. A risk-accepted approach leaves more holes unless enterprises keep a tab on them and re-assess their exposure and strategic position on the accepted risks.

Maintain control

Maintaining control over enterprise-owned devices is a must to be able to ward off potential threats and evaluate BYOD risks constantly. A BYOD brings in an additional attack surface and a vector, which is growing in size in terms of likelihood of threats and impact from such threats. Just multiply threats by the number of BYODs. Bringing One’s Own Risks is very well over and above other risks enterprises have been trying to stay ahead of. BYODs pose a huge security challenge, no doubt.

There are a few steps, which even small enterprises can take, provided the infrastructure supports.

1. Control access to corporate information resources through domain authentication
2. Create a VLAN (Virtual Local Area Network) for BYODs and make use of ACLs (Access Control List) as an additional layer in Network Defense
3. Allowing BYODs of different types definitely requires a wireless network, one more layer in your Defense
a. So, have the users authenticate themselves
b. Implement wireless encryption
c. Enforce a tight network access & security policy through the Wireless Access Controller
d. Make use of DHCP (Dynamic Host Control Protocol) to allow only policy-permitted IP addresses
e. Should you decide to go a bit further, make use of MAC address of BYODs
f. If you have a PKI infrastructure, client authentication of BYODs is possible with a little but worthwhile overhead
4. Email infrastructure such as an on-premise Microsoft Exchange or an Office365 infrastructure can help enforce an MDM (Mobile Device Management) capabilities through a mailbox policy
a. Limit retention of emails, most used application on most BYOD
b. Limit email attachment sizes
c. Require a password to access the phone
d. Enforce encryption on device storage as well as removable storage cards
e. Be in the know by keeping a tab on all devices that connect to your Email application and a few more controls
5. When a BYOD is within a corporation, one can subject them to the scrutiny by the network firewalls, IPS/IDS (Intrusion Prevention/Detection System) and leveraging on web content screening and filtering (Uniform Resource Locator).

Many BYODs are just used like a personal mobile Internet browsing shops inside an enterprise. In India, there is a regulation for such shops to keep a record of the users.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Opinion: Bring back airplane mode!

By Matt Hanson

Opinion: Bring back airplane mode!

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has announced that we no longer need to switch our smartphones (and other personal electronic devices) to airplane mode. Instead, we’ll be able to use our phones during any part of the flight, including take off and landing.

I don’t know about you but I’m already missing airplane mode.

I’m awful at sitting still with nothing to do, so I often go for my phone to check the news and browse a few sites. This quick browse often leads to a number of emails sent, several social media posts and numerous texts. If I’m luck, a loved one will call, if I’m not then an insurance scam will. Before long a few hours and half my battery has gone.

Airplane Mode

Being on a plane with airplane mode switched on and my phone disconnected from the outside world allows me (and all the other passengers) to enter into a rare oasis of tranquillity where work emails, passive-agressive Facebook statuses and mundane phonecalls have all been banished.

We all know long haul flights are enough of an ordeal already, without the person next to you incessantly jabbering on the phone while battling for supremacy over the arm rest. Now that people won’t need to put the phone down even briefly plane cabins could become even louder with the chatter of the air-borne cattle.

We won’t even be able to rely on network drops to grant us respite. Many flights now come with on board connectivity, which isn’t great news if you or your neighbour have a Wi-Fi calling-enabled phone and contract.

So even flying over the Bermuda Triangle (or other notorious network black spots like the South West of England) won’t be enough to disturb the call. We’ll have to use self discipline to pocket our phones, and who has any of that these days?

Airplane mode

Using airplane mode also gives our devices themselves a bit of a break as well. With network and other battery-draining features turned off, they become little more than glorified watches, MP3 players and handheld games consoles.

This means that even after the longest flights we still usually end up with enough battery juice left for essential calls after we’ve cleared passport control.

Now that we’ll have non-stop access to all the battery-draining delights our smartphones can offer we might see more people rushing to power sockets after they’ve disembarked, rather than to baggage claim.

At the moment it’s up to the airlines to decide whether to allow non-stop use of smartphones during their flights, so I humbly ask them to say no! Keep the requirement for airplane mode! If not for safety, then for the sanity of its passengers.

Thankfully the US has, for now, remained undecided on the issue. But this decision by the EASA will almost certainly bring more attention to the question of in-flight calls.

I can only hope that possible plans to ban calls on US flights, as well as the attendants trying to make it a legal issue not to use them go ahead. The thought of a transatlantic flight sat next to an obnoxious phone user is enough to make me want to go by sea.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Opinion: Bring back airplane mode!

By Matt Hanson

Opinion: Bring back airplane mode!

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has announced that we no longer need to switch our smartphones (and other personal electronic devices) to airplane mode. Instead, we’ll be able to use our phones during any part of the flight, including take off and landing.

I don’t know about you but I’m already missing airplane mode.

I’m awful at sitting still with nothing to do, so I often go for my phone to check the news and browse a few sites. This quick browse often leads to a number of emails sent, several social media posts and numerous texts. If I’m luck, a loved one will call, if I’m not then an insurance scam will. Before long a few hours and half my battery has gone.

Airplane Mode

Being on a plane with airplane mode switched on and my phone disconnected from the outside world allows me (and all the other passengers) to enter into a rare oasis of tranquillity where work emails, passive-agressive Facebook statuses and mundane phonecalls have all been banished.

We all know long haul flights are enough of an ordeal already, without the person next to you incessantly jabbering on the phone while battling for supremacy over the arm rest. Now that people won’t need to put the phone down even briefly plane cabins could become even louder with the chatter of the air-borne cattle.

We won’t even be able to rely on network drops to grant us respite. Many flights now come with on board connectivity, which isn’t great news if you or your neighbour have a Wi-Fi calling-enabled phone and contract.

So even flying over the Bermuda Triangle (or other notorious network black spots like the South West of England) won’t be enough to disturb the call. We’ll have to use self discipline to pocket our phones, and who has any of that these days?

Airplane mode

Using airplane mode also gives our devices themselves a bit of a break as well. With network and other battery-draining features turned off, they become little more than glorified watches, MP3 players and handheld games consoles.

This means that even after the longest flights we still usually end up with enough battery juice left for essential calls after we’ve cleared passport control.

Now that we’ll have non-stop access to all the battery-draining delights our smartphones can offer we might see more people rushing to power sockets after they’ve disembarked, rather than to baggage claim.

At the moment it’s up to the airlines to decide whether to allow non-stop use of smartphones during their flights, so I humbly ask them to say no! Keep the requirement for airplane mode! If not for safety, then for the sanity of its passengers.

Thankfully the US has, for now, remained undecided on the issue. But this decision by the EASA will almost certainly bring more attention to the question of in-flight calls.

I can only hope that possible plans to ban calls on US flights, as well as the attendants trying to make it a legal issue not to use them go ahead. The thought of a transatlantic flight sat next to an obnoxious phone user is enough to make me want to go by sea.

…read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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Updated: Cool gadgets: The best tech you can buy in 2014

By James Rivington

Updated: Cool gadgets: The best tech you can buy in 2014

Cool Gadgets 2014: the best tech money can buy

It’s our mission at TechRadar to help you find the tech products that are best for you.

That’s why we review the specific products we do, while offering a veritable smorgasbord of helpful buying guides and product round-ups to help you find the cool gadgets, perfect play things and workplace wonders.

Whether it be an ideal camera phone for your mum or a kick-ass Blu-ray player to pair with your new TV, we’ve got the experts on hand to offer the very best buying advice on the internet.

Here you’ll find a comprehensive repository of all that expert knowledge. With buying advice and specific product recommendations, look no further for your best chance of finding all the cool gadgets available today.

Phones and tablets

iPhone 5S review

Best mobile phones

Which one should you buy?

We’ve played with nearly every device on the market and have found the ten best you can spend your money on. It needs to be good, after all, given it will reside in your pocket for the next two years. Our ranking of the best mobile phones available in the UK today celebrates the brilliance of the smartphone: we love handsets that add in functionality to enrich our lives in so many different ways. We also partially take into account the price of the phone too – meaning a low-price handset doesn’t always need to have high-spec functions to be in our top 10.
Read: 10 best phones in the world today

Google Nexus 5

Best Android phones

Comparing the best Google phones

There’s one key way in which Android is massively different from its Apple-branded smartphone competition – the number of phones out there running Google’s hot mobile OS. So here they are – the best Android phones money can buy today. For many, many different reasons. Read: Best Android phone 2014 – which one should you buy?

Nokia lumia 920

Best Windows Phones

Which Windows Phone 8 handset is for you?

The recently launched Windows Phone 8.1 replicates the popular features of Android and iOS whilst combining the comfort of home computing with the convenience of mobile. We’ve looked at the Windows Phone devices on offer and picked out the best ones around to guarantee you get the best bang for your buck. Nokia still dominates the list but as a Microsoft entity, that’s no surprise. Read: Best Windows Phone 2014

HTC One SV

Best cheap phones

Testing all the best budget blowers!

With the mobile marketplace teeming with a multitude of highly priced smartphones, one might wonder whether cheap phones still have a place in the mobile infrastructure. With massive innovation in both hardware and operating systems, phones now do a lot more than just let you talk and text, with handsets like the Samsung Galaxy S4, HTC One and iPhone 5S stealing headlines around the world these days. Sadly all this innovation isn’t cheap – and most of it is reserved for high-end contract handsets. So, is there such a thing as the ‘best phone on a budget’?
Read: Best cheap smartphones 2014

Samsung Galaxy Note 3 review

Best phablets

They’re big, bad mobile machines

Our hands might not be getting any bigger but our phones certainly are. As flagships like the LG G3 andOnePlus One creep up to 5.5 inches, phablets are starting to resemble small tablets, arguably filling the roles of both a smartphone and a slate. If you think that one device is better than two, or just have really big hands, then there is a growing selection of phones to suit and these are the ten best.
Read: 10 best phablets in the world

iPad mini

Best tablets

All the top tablets compared

Tablets are taking the world by storm. Just a few years ago they were an unknown for many people, but nowadays you’ve got more choice than you can shake a mildly agitated badger at. And with choice comes decisions – difficult decisions. Do you eschew Apple’s high prices, join the Android brigade and find the best iPad alternative? Or jump on board Cupertino’s lovetrain, and use one of the most popular tablets on the planet? We’ve made it easy for you and pulled together the top 10 tablets of the moment available. Read: 10 Best tablets 2014

Tesco Hudl

Best cheap tablets

Spend a little, don’t spend a lot

Tablets are fast replacing laptops as the must-have computing item, and the good news is that you don’t have to spend a lot of money to get one. While the iPads of this world will always be out of many people’s budgets, there are plenty of tablets out there available at much lower prices. We wouldn’t recommend spending less than £100 on one – you’d regret it – but here’s a round-up of our favourite tablets under £250! Best cheap tablets: top budget options

Home Entertainment

Best TV 2014: what TV should you buy?

TV Buying Guide 2014

Choose the right size, screen tech and price

There has never been a better time to buy a new TV. Gone are the days when 32-inch TVs weighed 16 tonnes and cost £1,500. These days you can pick up a 50-inch LCD TV for closer to £300. LCD panel technology has well and truly matured, and while brands like Sony and Panasonic push the boundaries of performance, you’ll also find names like Toshiba doing very exciting things in the budget TV sector. The practical upshot of this is that no matter what you’re after, how big you want to go or how large your budget is, there’s a perfect TV out there for you. So which one is right for you, your family and your living space? In this buying guide, we will walk you through everything you need to know about being a new TV.
Read: Buying Guide: best TVs 2014

best 32-inch tvs

Best 32-inch TVs

The perfect size for bedroom TVs or sets for smaller rooms

Most living rooms …read more

Source:: Tech Radar

Thumbnail for 46917

Updated: Cool gadgets: The best tech you can buy in 2014

By James Rivington

Updated: Cool gadgets: The best tech you can buy in 2014

Cool Gadgets 2014: the best tech money can buy

It’s our mission at TechRadar to help you find the tech products that are best for you.

That’s why we review the specific products we do, while offering a veritable smorgasbord of helpful buying guides and product round-ups to help you find the cool gadgets, perfect play things and workplace wonders.

Whether it be an ideal camera phone for your mum or a kick-ass Blu-ray player to pair with your new TV, we’ve got the experts on hand to offer the very best buying advice on the internet.

Here you’ll find a comprehensive repository of all that expert knowledge. With buying advice and specific product recommendations, look no further for your best chance of finding all the cool gadgets available today.

Phones and tablets

iPhone 5S review

Best mobile phones

Which one should you buy?

We’ve played with nearly every device on the market and have found the ten best you can spend your money on. It needs to be good, after all, given it will reside in your pocket for the next two years. Our ranking of the best mobile phones available in the UK today celebrates the brilliance of the smartphone: we love handsets that add in functionality to enrich our lives in so many different ways. We also partially take into account the price of the phone too – meaning a low-price handset doesn’t always need to have high-spec functions to be in our top 10.
Read: 10 best phones in the world today

Google Nexus 5

Best Android phones

Comparing the best Google phones

There’s one key way in which Android is massively different from its Apple-branded smartphone competition – the number of phones out there running Google’s hot mobile OS. So here they are – the best Android phones money can buy today. For many, many different reasons. Read: Best Android phone 2014 – which one should you buy?

Nokia lumia 920

Best Windows Phones

Which Windows Phone 8 handset is for you?

The recently launched Windows Phone 8.1 replicates the popular features of Android and iOS whilst combining the comfort of home computing with the convenience of mobile. We’ve looked at the Windows Phone devices on offer and picked out the best ones around to guarantee you get the best bang for your buck. Nokia still dominates the list but as a Microsoft entity, that’s no surprise. Read: Best Windows Phone 2014

HTC One SV

Best cheap phones

Testing all the best budget blowers!

With the mobile marketplace teeming with a multitude of highly priced smartphones, one might wonder whether cheap phones still have a place in the mobile infrastructure. With massive innovation in both hardware and operating systems, phones now do a lot more than just let you talk and text, with handsets like the Samsung Galaxy S4, HTC One and iPhone 5S stealing headlines around the world these days. Sadly all this innovation isn’t cheap – and most of it is reserved for high-end contract handsets. So, is there such a thing as the ‘best phone on a budget’?
Read: Best cheap smartphones 2014

Samsung Galaxy Note 3 review

Best phablets

They’re big, bad mobile machines

Our hands might not be getting any bigger but our phones certainly are. As flagships like the LG G3 andOnePlus One creep up to 5.5 inches, phablets are starting to resemble small tablets, arguably filling the roles of both a smartphone and a slate. If you think that one device is better than two, or just have really big hands, then there is a growing selection of phones to suit and these are the ten best.
Read: 10 best phablets in the world

iPad mini

Best tablets

All the top tablets compared

Tablets are taking the world by storm. Just a few years ago they were an unknown for many people, but nowadays you’ve got more choice than you can shake a mildly agitated badger at. And with choice comes decisions – difficult decisions. Do you eschew Apple’s high prices, join the Android brigade and find the best iPad alternative? Or jump on board Cupertino’s lovetrain, and use one of the most popular tablets on the planet? We’ve made it easy for you and pulled together the top 10 tablets of the moment available. Read: 10 Best tablets 2014

Tesco Hudl

Best cheap tablets

Spend a little, don’t spend a lot

Tablets are fast replacing laptops as the must-have computing item, and the good news is that you don’t have to spend a lot of money to get one. While the iPads of this world will always be out of many people’s budgets, there are plenty of tablets out there available at much lower prices. We wouldn’t recommend spending less than £100 on one – you’d regret it – but here’s a round-up of our favourite tablets under £250! Best cheap tablets: top budget options

Home Entertainment

Best TV 2014: what TV should you buy?

TV Buying Guide 2014

Choose the right size, screen tech and price

There has never been a better time to buy a new TV. Gone are the days when 32-inch TVs weighed 16 tonnes and cost £1,500. These days you can pick up a 50-inch LCD TV for closer to £300. LCD panel technology has well and truly matured, and while brands like Sony and Panasonic push the boundaries of performance, you’ll also find names like Toshiba doing very exciting things in the budget TV sector. The practical upshot of this is that no matter what you’re after, how big you want to go or how large your budget is, there’s a perfect TV out there for you. So which one is right for you, your family and your living space? In this buying guide, we will walk you through everything you need to know about being a new TV.
Read: Buying Guide: best TVs 2014

best 32-inch tvs

Best 32-inch TVs

The perfect size for bedroom TVs or sets for smaller rooms

Most living rooms …read more

Source:: Tech Radar

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NRG Player Full v1.1.8C Apk

By apkdreams

NRG Player Full v1.1.8C Apk

NRG Player Full Apk - is a wonderful and beautiful music player for Android user with EQ, plays songs from folders and customizable consumer interface.

Key Features:-

  • Graphical equalizer, presets
  • Play songs from folders and gadget media library
  • Widgets and lockscreen
  • Headset fortify
  • Tag editor
  • Runs on Android 1.6 or larger

What’s New in v1.1.8C Apk

  • Everlsating Menu buttons for all units
  • Add a couple of playlists to playback queue
  • Method to disable album artwork replace
  • Auto seek for new songs after altering track search directories
  • Reinforce MPC layout
  • Repair unsuitable reminiscene card detection

NRG Player Full v1.1.8C Apk

Download Now

More info from Google Play Store

…read more

Source:: apps

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ScanBiz Cards Premium v3.0.2 Apk

By apkdreams

ScanBiz Cards Premium v3.0.2 Apk

ScanBiz Cards Premium Apk - is a wonderful application for Android users. Scan business cards in seconds. Snap a photo- Scan- Save to address book.

Bored with preserving monitor of what you are promoting playing cards?

ScanBiz means that you can maintain your entire industry playing cards to your pocket.

We are the one trade card reader that offers you the solution to scan the cardboard to your cellphone or post the cardboard for a 100% correct handbook transcription.

  • Snap or import a photograph of a business card
  • Scan the cardboard
  • Assessment and edit the consequences along side the cardboard picture
  • Add to the address ebook or merge with current contact

What’s New in v3.0.2 Apk

  • Resolved crashes
  • Bug fixes and enhancements

ScanBiz Cards Premium v3.0.2 Apk

Download Now

More info from Google Play Store

…read more

Source:: apps

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9GAG Funny pics and Videos v2.9.8 Apk

By apkdreams

9GAG Funny pics and Videos v2.9.8 Apk

9GAG Funny pics and Videos Apk - has the best funny pics, GIFs, videos, memes, adorable, wtf, geeky, cosplay images on the internet.

Key Features:-

  • Perfect humorous percent, GIFs, videos, memes, lovable images on the Internet.
  • Characteristic one of the best assortment of funny, superior, wtf, omg, fail, adorable, geeky, cosplay pictures, rage comics and viral movies
  • Vote on trending and recent web page to decide what will be sizzling on the web subsequent day
  • Subscribe to discussions with the group and make friends from all over the place the arena
  • Share to Facebook, Twitter etc

What’s New in v2.9.9 Apk

  • Fixed a safety problem
  • Fixed battery draining downside
  • New permission required for higher crash knowledge logging

9GAG Funny pics and Videos v2.9.8 Apk

Download Now

More info from Google Play Store

…read more

Source:: apps

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Facebook v20.0.0.23.15 Apk

By apkdreams

Facebook v20.0.0.23.15 Apk

Facebook Apk - is a wonderful application for using Facebook for Android users. Share and keep related with your mates. Keeping up with friends is faster than ever.

Key Features:-

  • See what friends are up to
  • Share updates, images and movies
  • Get notified when friends like and comment on your posts
  • Textual content, chat and have group conversations
  • Play video games and use your favorite apps

Facebook v20.0.0.23.15 Apk

Download Now

…read more

Source:: apps

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Inbox by Gmail v1.0 Apk

By apkdreams

Inbox by Gmail v1.0 Apk

Inbox by Gmail Apk - is an amazing app for Android users. Your email inbox will have to mean you can reside and work higher, however as an alternative it continuously buries the essential stuff and creates extra stress than it relieves.

Inbox, constructed by the Gmail crew, retains issues geared up and helps you get again to what issues.

Bundles. Similar messages are bundled collectively so which you can take care of them unexpectedly. Eliminate them with one faucet.

Highlights. Get crucial data without even opening the message. Test in for flights, see delivery knowledge for purchases and consider pictures from friends proper up entrance.

Reminders. Greater than mail, which you can add reminders so your inbox comprises the entire stuff you want to get again to.

Snooze emails and reminders to come back again if you end up able to care for them, subsequent week while you get residence or on every occasion you select.

Inbox by Gmail v1.0 Apk

Download Now

More info from Google Play Store

…read more

Source:: apps

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JB Extreme Theme CM11 AOKP v5.64 Apk

By apkdreams

JB Extreme Theme CM11 AOKP v5.64 Apk

JB Extreme Theme CM11 AOKP Apk - is a wonderful theme for Android users. When making use if theme in theme chooser, you could get a message announcing This theme is lacking property on your gadgets monitor, press apply anyways.

Key Features:-

  • Custom, original design work
  • Customized wallpaper
  • 4500+ custom images
  • Root Required

Supported ROMs':

  • CM 9, 10, 10.1
  • AOKP ICS, JB
  • Paranoid Android
  • BAM
  • Slim
  • Eclipse
  • Baked Bean
  • EOS

This theme is designed for MDPI, HDPI and XHDPI gadgets.

What’s New in v5.64 Apk

  • Updated and fixed play music 5.7
  • Skinned icons on CM One plus lock screen

JB Extreme Theme CM11 AOKP v5.64 Apk

Download Now

More info from Google Play Store

…read more

Source:: apps

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Cross DJ Mix your Music v2.0 Apk

By apkdreams

Cross DJ Mix your Music v2.0 Apk

Cross DJ Mix your Music Apk - is a wonderful and professional DJ experience for Android. Good looks, great surrounding FX, great sync engine, slip mode, proper loops and cues.

Key Features:-

  • Accurate BPM detection
  • One press and the 2 tracks never go put of phase
  • Pre listen your tracks before mixing them
  • Manual pitch and pitch blend
  • Beat grid editing, to make sure old tracks sync correctly
  • Parallel wave forms mode to visually check if your tracks are synced
  • Hot cues and loops are automatically set on the beat
  • Tap on the waveform to fast forward and get a seamless jump
  • Let cross DJ mix your tracks automatically, from any sources
  • Best performance for an Android DJ app
  • Music reacts instantly to your actions
  • Extremely realistic scratch sound
  • 15 effects
  • No load time when starting up the app
  • 2 turntables, cross fader, full fledged 3 band EQ mixer
  • Large buttons, optimized for small screens
  • Direct access to your music
  • HQ Live recording of your mixes

What’s New in v2.0 Apk

  • New waveform view
  • See the music, scratch the waveforms and set cue accurately
  • +2 advanced settings. Beat grid editing and pinch to zoom
  • Separate tabs
  • Swipe to display different panels on the left and right
  • Key detection
  • Detect the key of the songs and know which tracks sound good together
  • Synced sampler
  • Loops are now synced to main player

Cross DJ Mix your Music v2.0 Apk

Download Now

More info from Google Play Store

…read more

Source:: apps

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Flash Image GUI v1.6.6 Apk

By apkdreams

Flash Image GUI v1.6.6 Apk

Flash Image GUI Apk - root access is required to use this application. Only supports HTC EVO 3D, HTC EVO, EVO SHIFT, VIVID/HOLIDAY, AMAZE 4G, SAMSUNG/ GOOGLE NEXUS, SAMSUNG MOMENT etc.

No more recovery mode or adb required to flash kernels, boot logos and recoveries. Flash custom kernels, logos and recoveries all from one convenient Android application.

Application displays the current kernel and version loaded on the device. Gives two convenient options when flashing the kernel to also wipe the dalvik cache and the cache partition.

Before loading a ROM, first flash the kernel portion of the ROM using this application, then reboot directly to recovery mode and flash the rest of the ROM.

No more having to use fast boot via USB to load the kernel portion of a ROM using this application, then reboot directly to recovery mode and flash the rest of the ROM.

What’s New in v1.6.6 Apk

  • Added OnePlus One support
  • Added HTC One M8 support
  • Minor bug fixes

Flash Image GUI v1.6.6 Apk

Download Now

More info from Google Play Store

…read more

Source:: apps